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A Must Attend Event for European Readers: Advisen’s Cyber Liability Insights Conference

I strongly encourage our many European readers to attend the upcoming Advisen Cyber Liability Insights Conference to be held on 13 March at The Willis Building in the City. The inaugural Cyber Insights Conference which Advisen presented in NYC in October was a smashing success and the program planners are expecting an equally respectable turnout in London.

Our friends at Advisen have recruited thought leaders from across the European cyber and technology industries (and a certain U.S. lawyer/blogger) to discuss a myriad of topics of interest to underwriters, brokers and risk managers alike. Speakers include luminaries such as Paul Bantick of Beazley, Stephen Boddington of Chartis, Robert Bond of Speechly Bircham, Dan Trueman of ANV, Chris Cotterell of Safeonline, Emily Freeman of Lockton, Simon Milner of JLT Specialty, Joe Trotti and Jeremy Smith of Willis, Tony Dearsley of Kroll Ontrack, Stewart Room of Field Fisher Waterhouse, Andrew Horrocks of Clydes, yours truly, and a host of others.

Among other cutting-edge topics, we will discuss Privacy and Data Security Regulation, Coverages and Coverage Issues, CyberSecurity Disclosures and Exposures, and Data Breach Responses and Strategies.

Equally important, the program is priced at a level that firms and companies will find extremely attractive. And did I mention that there is no cost at all for Risk Managers to attend?

For program and registration information, please visit https://www.signup4.net/Public/ap.aspx?EID=CYBE21E. Or, feel free to drop me a line at rbortnick@cozen.com.

I look forward to seeing everyone there!

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The Coverage Question

We are grateful to the rapidly-growing number of Cyberinquirer readers who continue to submit substantive content for publication. This truly is an industry blog, and we strive to present alternative points of view from all quarters.

The following article was authored by Gregg A. Rapoport, Esq., and David Lam, CISSP, CPP. Attorney Rapoport has represented policyholders in coverage litigation for over 20 years as part of a broad business litigation practice based in Pasadena, California. Mr. Lam is vice president of the Los Angeles Information Systems Security Association and has over 20 years of experience as an IT and information security professional and author. This article was first published by RIMS, and we appreciate Messrs. Rapoport and Lam offering it for republication here.

Rick Bortnick

As they confront the sobering question of whether their networks and the data they carry are fully secure, today’s “C-level” executives are becoming fluent in once-esoteric information security terms. Many have reached the conclusion that no matter the size of their IT and security budgets, there is no foolproof system for securing the confidentiality, integrity and availability of their data. Company networks remain vulnerable to attacks even if they adhere to industry best practices and run best-of-breed firewalls.

To address these security challenges, companies are relying on their risk managers to evaluate the applicability of existing insurance coverage to data breach incidents, and to assess the value of transferring some of the uncovered financial risk to one of the carriers now offering cyber-risk insurance policies. As the market for these products matures, premiums have come down significantly and policy limits have increased.

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An Insurer’s View: Examining the Rising Costs of Breaches

The following article, written by reknowned London Market underwriter Rick Welsh, was first published in the November 2011 Data Guidance newsletter. A shout out to Rick for passing it on to us for republication.

Rick Bortnick

Today, no company – even with comprehensive privacy policies and practices – can be safe from data breaches. Can companies effectively transfer the risk (and cost) of data breaches by way of insurance? What costs should the companies consider? Almost every reference to the cost of data breaches or ‘cyber crime’ identifies the actual cost of the breach notification as its common currency. In Part One of this analysis, Rick Welsh, Cyber Underwriting Director at ANV, explores this metric’s limitations and the true exposure and cost of data breaches.

The well-regarded Ponemon Institute is constantly measuring the cost of a data breach and is commonly referenced by many to express the rising cost of data breaches. The second annual ‘Cost of Cyber Crime Study’ issued by the Ponemon Institute in August 2011, found that the median annualised cost of cyber crime for the 50 companies in the study was $5.9 million, with a range being between $1.5 million to $36.5 million. The annualised average was up 56% from the previous year’s study.

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Insurance Recovery for Loss or Liability Arising from Cyberattacks: Obtain and Preserve Insurance for Your Company’s Protection

The following article was written by my good friend, Scott Godes, a policyholder attorney with Dickstein Shapiro in Washington, D.C., and his colleague, Ken Trotter, and appeared on Scott’s personal site, Corporate Insurance Blog, after being published by Hospitality Upgrade magazine. Cyberinquirer neither ratifies nor necessarily agrees with the opinions stated below, which are Scott’s exclusively and not those of Cyberinquirer or Dickstein Shapiro.

Rick Bortnick

It is no secret that the hospitality industry continues to be vulnerable to data breaches and other cyberattacks. A report by Willis Group Holdings, a British insurance firm, states that the largest share of cyberattacks (38 percent) were aimed at hotels, resorts and tour companies. According to the report, insurance claims for data theft worldwide jumped 56 percent last year, with a bigger number of those attacks targeting the hospitality industry. Because businesses in the hospitality industry obtain and maintain confidential data from consumers–countless credit card records in particular–they will continue to be attractive targets for hackers and data thieves. Cybersecurity risks can cause a company to incur significant loss or liability. A data breach could result in the loss of important and sensitive customer information and, in some cyberevents, stolen company funds. Companies also may face liabilities to third parties under statutory and regulatory schemes, incurring costs to mitigate, remediate and comply with the liability under these statutes. Worse still, class action lawsuits have been filed around the country after data breaches, with plaintiffs alleging, among others, the loss of the value of their personal information, identity theft, invasion of privacy, negligence or contractual liability. Even when companies have had success in defeating class actions, they nonetheless incurred significant legal expenses when defending those lawsuits.

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New Cybersecurity Disclosure Guidance for Public Companies: Focusing Attention, Raising Questions

As regular Cyberinquirer readers know, on October 12, 2011, the SEC’s Division of Corporate Finance published “suggested” Guidance on public companies’ disclosures of their cyber risks and exposures. I published a personal perspective on the implications of the Guidance in an October 29, 2011 post (here). Since then, our friend John Doernberg of William Gallagher Associates in Boston has written an excellent, thoughtful article which adopts a more technical approach. As many of you may know, John is a Vice President at William Gallagher and focuses on privacy, information security and risk management issues. Before becoming an insurance broker in 1995, John practiced law at leading firms in New York and Boston. The following article first appeared at John’s own site, http://blog.wgains.com/?s=Doernberg, and is being republished here with his permission. Thanks John!

Rick Bortnick

Increased corporate reliance on computer networks and electronic data has brought a corresponding increase in risks associated with breaches of their security. Such breaches have become more frequent and severe. With these Guidelines, the Division has indicated that public companies and their advisors should focus greater attention on how disclosure obligations under the federal securities laws may be affected by the potential financial and operational impact of cybersecurity breaches.

The Guidelines note that cybersecurity breaches (generically referred to as cyber incidents) can be malicious (cyber-attacks) or unintentional. The Guidelines provide something of a rogue’s gallery of cyber malice: the gaining of unauthorized access to steal or corrupt sensitive data or to disrupt operations, denial of service attacks, sophisticated electronic circumvention of network security, and social engineering techniques such as phishing to extract passwords or other information that will enable the gaining of access.

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Keep Your Friends Close, But Your Facebook Posts Closer

“Facebook helps you connect and share with the people in your life.” That is the Facebook mantra, as displayed on its homepage, and the opening line of a recent – and extremely thorough! – Pennsylvania trial court decision regarding the discoverability of a plaintiff’s relevant Facebook information. The court’s conclusion: a plaintiff’s Facebook information is discoverable, provided the defendant has a good faith basis for seeking the material, because there is no confidential social networking privilege under Pennsylvania law and because the Stored Communications Act only applies to internet service providers. The take-away for Facebook users: be careful what you post – it’s not as “private” as you think!

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Join Us At The Upcoming PLUS Northwest Chapter Cyber Workshop

We’re only two weeks away from the season’s premier cyber education event: The PLUS Northwest Chapter & IIABKC Cyber Workshop, to be held on December 7 (a date which will live in infamy), 2011 at the Washington Athletic Club in downtown Seattle. This will be my first trip to Seattle, so I’m really looking forward to it, as well as to meeting those of you who attend. The panel is entitled Emerging Issues Surrounding Cyber Privacy and Security Risk and will run for a full three-hours (with a corresponding 3 Washington state CE credits), from 1.30 PM to 4.30 PM, to be followed by the always popular cocktail reception. The cost is to attend is dirt cheap, given the panelists and topic, as its $40 for PLUS members and $60 for non-members.

So, you’re wondering, who are the panelists? Well, PLUS Northwest has assembled a crackerjack lineup of the following special guest speakers:

David Molitano,Vice President/Division Manager, Content Technology & Services at OneBeacon Professional Insurance; Kimberly Horn, Claims Manager for Technology, Media and Business Services at Beazley Group; and Karl Peterson, Senior Vice President, E&O and eRisk Product Team at Willis Executive Risks Practice.

You’ll only get this quality of presenter at the PLUS Northwest Chapter event. Don’t be fooled by pretenders or others promoting cyber conferences with lesser lights. This is THE cyber event to attend. And the post-workshop cocktail reception is an added bonus.

Please feel free to contact PLUS or me if you have any questions or would like further details about the Workshop. We look forward to seeing you there! And, in particular, meeting with you afterwards. Plus (no pun intended), for Cyberinquirer subscribers only, the first cocktail is on me. Just flip an email and let me know you’re coming.

Rick

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Cyberinquirer Named As One of LexisNexis’s Top Insurance Blogs of 2011

With the help of our readers, Cyberinquirer has again been named as one of LexisNexis’s Top Insurance blogs 0f 2011. We are obviously flattered, particularly in view of the quality of the other blogs selected to this august list. It shows that people are reading what we have to say. And that, perhaps, they are interested in what we have to say. We sure hope that to be the case. We love thinking, reading and talking about tech, privacy and cyber related issues (yeah, admittedly we’re geeks). And we hope that you, our readers, gain from our insights, even if you don’t always agree with them.

So now that we’ve been recognized by LexisNexis for the second straight period, maybe some of you, our readers, will be more comfortable authoring a piece we can post. Remember, this blog is open to all relevant, responsible submissions, be they articles, commentaries, or just comments on something we have said that strikes a chord. If you’ve got something to say that may be of interest to others in the community, email it to me at rbortnick@cozen.com and I will get back with you promptly. We strive to publish fresh, interesting content on a regular basis, but its not always easy, as we do maintain law practices. And have other commitments. So flip your authored pieces. We’d actually appreciate it.

Needless to say, we couldn’t have done this on our own. So the honor is not just for us, but for you too. Thanks.

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The Hospitality Industry Revisited: Does Your Company Have Proper Coverage?


101387303-a0006-000338.530x298In a prior post (here), we discussed the frequency of cyber thefts in the hospitality industry in 2009. We have a decent idea of how many of you read that article. For those of you who haven’t, here’s my topic sentence: “38% of the credit card hacking events in 2009 involved the hospitality industry.” Yep. 38%.

And guess what? The hospitality industry remained a high-level target in 2010. Alright, if you’re connected to the hospitality industry, you probably knew that already. But what you might not realize is that you’re not out of the clear. And, things may be getting worse as the frequency of cyber criminality grows, and as the perpetrators become more sophisticated and cyber attacks propagate (more on that below).

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Would Your Company’s Insurance Cover a Cyberattack?

The following article was written by my good friend, Scott Godes, a policyholder attorney with Dickstein Shapiro in Washington, D.C., and first appeared on his personal site, Corporate Insurance Blog. Cyberinquirer neither ratifies nor necessarily agrees with the opinions stated below, which are Scott’s exclusively and not those of Cyberinquirer or Dickstein Shapiro. Responsible comment will gladly be published (promptly…). Please feel free to forward them to me at your convenience.

Rick Bortnick

On October 27, 2011, CNN.com posted:

A massive cyberattack that led to a vulnerability in RSA’s SecurID tags earlier this year also victimized Google, Facebook, Microsoft and many other big-named companies, according to a new analysis released this week.

The Krebs On Security blog posted:

Security experts have said that RSA wasn’t the only corporation victimized in the attack, and that dozens of other multinational companies were infiltrated using many of the same tools and Internet infrastructure.

This is in line with comments from others, including this quote from Digital Forensic Investigator News, that “2011 has quickly become the year of the cyber attack.” Would your insurance policies cover those events? Beyond the denial of service attacks that made news headlines, a shocking “80 percent of respondents” in a survey of “200 IT security execs” “have faced large scale denial of service attacks,” according to a ZDNet story. These attacks and threats do not appear to be on a downward trend. They continue to be in the news after cyberattacks allegedly took place against “U.S. government Web sites – including those of the White House and the State Department –” over the July 4, 2009 holiday weekend. The alleged attacks were not only against government sites; they allegedly included, “according to a cyber-security specialist who has been tracking the incidents, . . . those run by the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq, The Washington Post, Amazon.com and MarketWatch.” Themore recent ZDNet survey shows that a quarter of respondents faced denial of service attacks on a weekly or even daily basis, with cyberextortion threats being made as well.

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Securities Law and Cyber Disclosures… Perfect Together…Especially for Cyber and Tech Underwriters and Brokers. And Me

Its not often that worlds collide or that interests converge into one amorphous epiphany. But that’s exactly what happened to me recently, when the Division of Corporate Finance (DCF) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued a Disclosure Guidance identifying the types of information public companies should consider disclosing about cyber risks and events that could impact their financial statements. Now, the DCF has cautioned that the Disclosure Guidance only represents its own views and “is not a rule, regulation, or statement of the Securities and Exchange Commission.” The DCF also emphasizes right up front that “the Commission has neither approved nor disapproved its content.” Yeah, right. YOU be an officer or director or officer of a company that does not “comply” with the DCF’s “recommendations.”

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And Now, the Maine Event: Mitigation Costs Constitute Damages in Data-Breach Case

Businesses that necessarily require their customers to disclose credit card and personal information, beware. Just five days ago, the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that claims by class action plaintiffs for “mitigation damages” arising from alleged negligence and breach of contract were viable. Anderson v. Hannaford Brothers Co., Nos. 10–2384, 10–2450, 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 21239 (1st Cir. Oct. 20, 2011).

In Anderson, the electronic payment processing system of a national grocery chain, Hannaford Brothers Co., was breached by hackers in 2007. This resulted in the dissemination of as many as 4.2 million credit card and debit card numbers, expiration dates, and security codes. Hannaford Brothers was not notified of the breach until February 27, 2008 and subsequently contained the breach on March 10, 2008. A week later, Hannaford released a statement regarding the breach and announced that over 1,800 cases of fraud resulting from the theft already had been reported.

Following Hannaford’s announcement, several financial institutions immediately cancelled customers’ debit and credit cards. Some financial institutions, which refrained from immediately canceling the credit card, monitored the accounts for unusual activity, cancelling the cards, in many cases, without notifying the customer. Customers who asked that their cards be cancelled incurred fees from issuing banks for the replacement cards.

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Tenth Circuit “Dishes Out” Important Opinion Addressing The Scope Of Advertising Injury Coverage For Patent Infringement Claims

On October 17, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit issued a much-anticipated decision addressing the scope of “Advertising Injury” (“AI”) coverage for patent infringement claims. Dish Network Corp. v. Arch Specialty Ins. Co., No. 10-1445, __ F.3d __ , 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 20955 (10th Cir. 2011), rev’g, 734 F. Supp. 2d 1173 (D. Colo. 2010). The court, applying Colorado law, reversed a decision from the District of Colorado in which that court granted summary judgment to the insurers. In the underlying action, the plaintiff alleged that Dish Network Corp. (“Dish”) had infringed one or more of twenty-three patents by “making, using, offering to sell, and/or selling . . . automated telephone systems, including . . . the Dish Network customer service telephone system, that allow[s] Dish’s customers to perform pay-per-view ordering and customer service functions over the telephone.” The Tenth Circuit concluded that the record was unclear about how Dish actually used the technologies at issue, but that some of the patent-holder’s most well-known innovations involved interactive call processing.

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Facebook: Everything You Want To Know and More… Just a Discovery Request Away!

I recently attended a CLE that had a panel of social media experts who were discussing the role of Facebook, Twitter and MySpace in litigation. During a lull in the question and answer session, the Facebook attorney quipped: “you know, Facebook has already given you everything that you’ve ask for…” Immediately, the audience lifted their heads from their Blackberries and newspapers and started paying attention after this cryptic remark.

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INTRODUCTION TO CANADA’S PIPEDA PRIVACY LEGISLATION

I. Overview

Canada’s privacy regime can be described as a web of legislation at both the federal and provincial/territorial level. Some commentators express concern that this web has become tangled, lacks uniformity and actually undermines the predictability and consistency that, in their view, would exist under a single (federal) privacy regime. Canada has two primary privacy statutes: the Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (“PIPEDA”). The Privacy Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. P-21 (Can.), took effect on July 1, 1983, and imposed certain privacy rights obligations on approximately 250 federal government departments and agencies by limiting the use and disclosure of personal information. The Privacy Act also gives individuals the right to access and, if necessary, correct personal information held by governmental organizations subject to the Act.

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Underwriters and Their Policyholders Agree: Less Is More When It Comes to Crisis Management Expenses

Doug Pollack of IDExperts recently published a blog post on cyber insurance that caught my eye. Insofar as IDExperts is a respected provider of cyber breach response services, I assumed the article would address technical issues. Upon reading the piece, however, I was disappointed to find that the article addressed insurance-related matters, including criteria for the selection of insurance products and programs, a topic typically the province of risk managers, brokers, underwriters and lawyers. Hmmm…

At the outset, the article addresses technical issues, as the author correctly suggests that “privacy, compliance and legal officers should work closely with their risk manager to ensure that the organization is getting a policy that meets its needs.” Having hooked me with that truism, I was looking forward to reading on. But that is where the technical commentary (and our common perspective) ends. From there, the author moves on to express his views (and, in my counter-view, misconceptions) on cyber insurance products and how they should operate.

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Ensuring Discovery Compliance: Sanctions Relating to Past, Present, and Future Adverse Parties

First published on September 22, 2011 at e-Discovery Law Review
Monetary sanctions, attorneys fees, and adverse inference jury instructions are the more common type of sanctions imposed on litigants for the spoliation of evidence, or not producing relevant documents. Recently, however, a court has increased the severity and impact of sanctions by applying them not only to current litigation, but also to a party’s future litigation, with the effects lingering for years to come.

The Underlying Suit

“Any competent electronic discovery effort would have located this email.” These words were written in an opinion by a United States District Judge in the Eastern District of Texas in Green v. Blitz U.S.A., Inc., No. 2:07-CV-372 (E.D. Tex., Mar. 1, 2011) Green involved a product liability suit in which the requirement of a flame arrester was in dispute. The jury returned a defense verdict, and the plaintiff collected a low settlement amount as part of a high-low settlement agreement. During discovery in a subsequent case with the same defendant and plaintiff’s counsel, counsel learned of documents that were not produced in Green. The plaintiff then filed a motion for sanctions against the defendant in Green and a motion to re-open the Green case. While the court denied the motion to re-open because the statute of limitations had expired, the court did impose sanctions for the discovery abuse.

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For Some Universities, Cyber Insurance Doesn’t Make The Grade

Data security breaches pose a serious threat to a corporation’s financial stability as well as to its credibility in the marketplace. Most notably, the 2007 TJX data security breach, where 45 million credit card and debit card numbers were stolen, cost the company over $4 billion. For many corporations, the solution is to purchase a cyber liability insurance policy, which provides insurance coverage in the event of such a breach.

The risk of data security breaches has also affected students of universities throughout the nation. In June of last year, Cornell University officials informed 45,000 members of the school’s community that their personal information, including their names and social security numbers, was stolen after a University-owned laptop was stolen. Due to such breaches, college officials nationwide have begun purchasing cyber liability insurance policies to offset the financial burdens of a data security breach.

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John Keohane Remembered

We at Cyberinquirer will be taking a break this weekend. I am heading to NYC for a memorial in honor of our dear friend John Keohane, who perished that awful day at the age of 41. Many of you may have known John from his days with CIGNA, ACE and Zurich. He is still missed by his colleagues, friends and family and always will be. What a tragedy.

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Righthaven: SANCTIONED…but how much?

Well, this result seemed almost inevitable. After all, who gets away with misleading a court? Right? But is the amount of the sanction sufficient? Righthaven was ordered to pay a measly $5,000. Is that amount really going to punish Righthaven in any significant way?

Righthaven LLC is a copyright holding company, founded in March 2010, which acquires the rights to newspaper content from its partner newspapers (most notably, Stephens Media, which owns the Las Vegas Review Journal). Upon finding that content has been copied to online sites without permission, Righthaven initiates litigation against the site owners, alleging copyright infringement.
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Best Buy “Geeks” Out, Accusing Others of Trademark Infringement

In addition to being a trademark geek, I could be accurately accused of also being a tech geek. A “geek” is someone who loves using, and helping other people use, technology to help simplify his or her life. Best Buy, capitalizing on this endearing term for electronic lovers, created the Geek Squad, a tech support service. Their distinctive orange and black cars marked with their trademarked logo can be called out to provide in-home support or they are just a phone call away to help you with your technological needs.

There’s not too many other words other than geek that convey the nerdy type of people who love technology, but Best Buy is taking action against others who use “geek” for this purpose in their slogans. In a recent lawsuit against Newegg.com, Best Buy claimed trademark infringement over Newegg’s slogan “Geek On,” saying that the similarity between the motto, in addition to using orange and black in their logo, breaches their rights. And this is neither the first, nor the last, time that Best Buy will sue companies over this issue.

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What is Corporate and Business Identity Theft and What Are the Risks and Damages Associated with It?

The yellow fever outbreak of summer 1798 was the worst in Philadelphia’s history. Over 5,000 residents were infected, and nearly 1,300 died, causing even President Washington to flee. On the night of September 1st, 1798, the vault at Carpenter Hall was breached and the then-massive amount of $162,821 went missing. This first bank robbery in the United States, attributed as an “inside job”, ushered in an era of robberies that turned criminals into celebrities. Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, and John Dillinger have become legends. At present, the risk of yellow fever has been mitigated due to vaccines. The risk of bank vaults being physically robbed similarly has been reduced.

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Discovery in the Age of Cloud Computing

During the last decade, individuals and business have changed the way they manage their data by moving this data management offsite – otherwise known as cloud computing. This differs from the old model of information management that, more or less, mirrored the pre-computing era, meaning that an employee’s file might be kept in a cabinet in a Human Resources (“HR”) office or stored on a company’s in-house server. With cloud computing, however, that same employee file may be stored hundreds or thousands of miles away from the HR officer who needs to review it – or the IT officer tasked with preserving that data for potential litigation.

As discussed more fully in Rick Bortnick’s prior posts (here and here), cloud computing outsources data and software management, migrating it from the local to the global by providing instant access over the internet. According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing has five primary characteristics: (1) “on-demand self-service,” or the ability to call up stored data or capabilities as needed; (2) broad network access through a variety of platforms; (3) pooling resources providing “location independence”; (4) “rapid elasticity” in the distribution of computing capabilities, and (5) “measured service,” or service-appropriate control and optimization by the cloud system manager rather than the local user. It is the pooling of resources and the measured service managed by third-parties that pose the greatest risks during e-discovery.
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Cyber Liability Insurance for Universities: Incentivizing Best Practices as a Condition to Coverage (a.k.a “Reverse Underwriting”)

Computer hacking is a constantly evolving and growing threat. While recent high-profile network security breaches at companies such as Epsilon and Sony (with crisis management and other costs estimated to range from $1 billion to multiples thereof in the case of Sony) have helped raise awareness about the need to adequately protect personal identifiable information, the problem has existed for decades.

Yet the situation has only recently begun to receive proper attention from the media, government officials, businesses, and certain segments of the insurance industry. Of course, the cost of a security breach may have something to do with that. According to a study from Marsh and the Ponemon Institute, the typical data breach in FY 2010 resulted in companies and their insurers have to pay an average of $7.2 million to deal with and remedy the situation.

One particularly alluring target for hackers has been educational institutions. While schools and universities may not immediately appear to be obvious targets, the statistics confirm that attacks against educational institutions are on the rise.

In 2007, educational institutions accounted for 25% of all reported data breaches. This number jumped to 33% in 2008. See Sarah Stephens & Shannan Fort, Cyber Liability & Higher Education, Aon Professional Risk Solutions White Paper (December 2008) Read the rest of this entry »

Righthaven’s Ba-aaaaack….but its Aim Falls Short

It seems Righthaven hasn’t been able to catch a break since my December 2010 post. Righthaven LLC is a copyright holding company founded in early 2010, which acquires newspaper content from its partner newspapers after finding that the content has been copied to online sites without permission, in order to engage in litigation against the site owners for copyright infringement.

Just last week, in a suit filed against Democratic Underground (“D.U.”), Righthaven sought damages because D.U. used four paragraphs of a 34 paragraph Las Vegas Review Journal article (recall that the Journal and its contents belong to Stephens Media). The post included a link to the full article, as well as citing the Journal.

U.S. District Court Judge Roger Hunt dismissed the lawsuit, holding that a “copyright owner [here, Stephens Media] could not assign a bare right to sue.” In addition, the court came down hard on Righthaven because it failed to advise, as required by law, that Stephens Media had a pecuniary interest in the lawsuits (Righthaven and Stephens Media were sharing the profits received from these lawsuits). Judge Hunt seemed disgusted with Righthaven’s behavior and gave Righthaven two weeks “to show cause … why [Righthaven] should not be sanctioned for this flagrant misrepresentation to the court.” Judge Hunt accused Righthaven of trying to “manufacture standing” in all of its cases. (Click here for the Court’s full decision.) Read the rest of this entry »

Credit Monitoring vs. Identity Monitoring

Today, data breaches are a frequent occurrence. Often with the disclosure of each breach comes an announcement of credit report monitoring for affected individuals for a certain time period. So what does credit monitoring really provide? Identity protection, peace of mind or simply customer goodwill?

Credit report monitoring is the checking of one’s credit history in order to detect suspicious activity or changes. Companies that provide credit monitoring typically will alert the individual to activity tied to his or her social security number, such as credit inquiries, delinquencies, negative information, employment changes and new accounts. So why does credit monitoring fail to provide identity theft protection?

1. First, individuals can receive a free credit report on an annual basis. The three credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, have set up the following internet website, through which individuals can request free copies of their annual credit reports: https://www.annualcreditreport.com/cra/index.jsp.

2. Secondly, criminals will wait at least one year and one day in the brokering or use of stolen data if the company that sustained the privacy breach offers one year credit monitoring.

3. Third, credit monitoring primarily serves to alert, after the fact, the opening of new accounts. In turn, it typically does not warn the individual of changes with their existing credit. Hence, to the extent the persons’ current credit ratings have been adversely affected by the malicious acts of a third-party, they may go unreported and be unknown to the person whose credit has been impacted.

4. Fourth and most importantly, credit monitoring fails to protect against the malevolent conduct listed below, as outlined by the non-profit Identity Theft Resource Center:

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Cyber Security On President Obama’s Agenda

Faced with revitalizing a deteriorated economy, formulating a national budget, and the aftermath of Osama Bin Laden’s death, President Barack Obama has his hands full. Yet, in the midst of all the issues commanding the White House’s attention, the Obama Administration somehow has found time to address the threats to our nation’s cyber security.

According to Business Insurance, on Thursday, May 12, 2011, the Obama Administration proposed cyber security legislation to improve protection for individuals and the federal government’s computer and network systems. The proposed legislation would address national data breach reporting by creating simpler and standardized reporting requirements for the 47 states that contain such requirements. The proposal would also synchronize penalties for computer crimes with other crimes. Additionally, the government, through the Department of Homeland Security, would become directly involved in assisting the industry as well as state and local governments in policing and enforcing cyber security. The proposed legislation encourages the state and local governments to share information with the Department of Homeland Security about cyber threats or related incidents by providing them with immunity for doing so.

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“Anonymous” Hacks PlayStation Network and Sony Feels the Pain

Security is, I would say, our top priority because for all the exciting things you will be able to do with computers – organizing your lives, staying in touch with people, being creative – if we don’t solve these security problems, then people will hold back.
If anyone still harbors the notion that video games are simple distractions from the age of Pong, they haven’t seen the latest statistics. One of the most popular games released last year, “Call of Duty: Black Ops”, generated $650 million in the first five days of sales and exceeded $1 billion in record time. The achievement put the game in the company of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” album and James Cameron’s movie “Titanic.” As a whole, the video game industry has been valued at over $100 billion. That massive size and scope makes the impact of a cyber attack all the more devastating.

Cyber Crime and Securities Fraud Litigation: The Next Wave?

Following the publication of our original post on the implications of a cyber attack on investors’ securities portfolios (see here), we have been asked by scores of readers whether securities fraud litigation arising from cyber crime has ensued. Not surprisingly, the answer is “yes.”

Indeed, we have located at least two such cases, one a putative securities fraud class action against a payment processing company and the second an SEC initiated action against a private investor. The results may (or may not) surprise you, depending on your perspective of trial courts’ levels of judicial activism and willingness to render substantive decisions at early stages of litigation.

In re: Heartland Payment Systems, No. 09-1043 (D.N.J. Dec. 07, 2009) remains the paradigm for such litigation. To facilitate its payment processing services, Heartland Payment Systems (“Heartland”) stored millions of credit and debit card numbers on its internal computer network. In December 2007, hackers launched a Structured Query Language Attack (“SQL attack”) on Heartland’s payroll management system. To its credit, Heartland was able to successfully avert the attack before any personally identifiable information was stolen. At the same time, however, the company failed to detect malicious software (“malware”) which had been placed on the network by the SQL attack. The malware infected Heartland’s payment processing system, ultimately enabling the hackers to steal 130 million consumer credit and debit card numbers. Heartland did not discover the breach until January 2009, at which time it notified government authorities and publicly disclosed the event. Over the course of the following month, Heartland’s stock price dropped over $15 per share. Perhaps not surprisingly, shareholder class actions ensued.

In their complaint, plaintiffs alleged that Heartland and its officers and directors had made material misrepresentations and omissions about the December 2007 SQL attack. Specifically, plaintiffs claimed that the defendants concealed the SQL attack and misrepresented the general state of Heartland’s data security. Plaintiffs further alleged that the defendants’ conduct was fraudulent because they were aware that Heartland’s network had been breached, yet they had not fully remedied the problem Read the rest of this entry »

Upcoming HB/NetDiligence Cyber Security Conference, June 9-10, 2011

I am proud to be a Co-Chair of the 2nd Annual NetDiligence Cyber Risk & Privacy Liability Forum which will take place June 9-10, 2011, at the historic Philadelphia Union League. Last year’s program was a huge success and the program planners are expecting the turnout to be even bigger this year.

NetDiligence and HB Conferences have teamed up to pull together thought leaders in the cyber/privacy industry to address the most urgent subjects. The program is fully accredited for continuing education and is priced at a level firms and companies will find attractive.

Over the course of a day an a half, we will present 45 industry-leading experts. I will help moderate the Conference, together with my Co-Chairs, Oliver Brew of Hiscox USA, Toby Merrill of ACE Professional Risk and Meredith Schnur of Wells Fargo Insurance Services USA. Also featured will be a keynote address by Jeffrey L. Seglin, nationally syndicated columnist of The Right Thing and author of The Right Thing: Conscience, Profit and Personal Responsibility in Today’s Business.

For program and registration information, go to http://litigationconferences.com/?p=17865. I look forward to seeing you there!

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Bloggers Beware: Righthaven’s got its eye on you…

Whether you own a website where you allow blogs and comments to be posted, or if you are the blogger/poster, listen up.

For those of you who haven’t heard of Righthaven LLC, they are to the blogging world what editors are to the Law Review world…cite-checking and anti-plagiarism “proponents” (let’s call ‘em that, for argument’s sake). Righthaven’s been making quite a splash and has gained popularity among news chains since its coming into existence in the spring of 2010. According to David Kravets’ article, “Righthaven Expands Troll Operation With Newspaper Giant[1], Righthaven has filed over 180 lawsuits and has settled over 70 of them already. Its major suppliers of copyrighted material include Stephens Media (owners of Las Vegas Review-Journal), MediaNews Group (owners of San Jose Mercury News and the Denver Post), and WEHCO Media (owners of Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and Chattanooga Times Free Fress), to name a few.[2] Owned by Net Sortie Systems LLC and SI Content Monitor LLC, Righthaven is the brain-child of Las Vegas-based IP attorney, Steven Gibson.[3] Righthaven’s clients assign their rights in the content to Righthaven, who then sues for copyright infringement.[4]

In order to analyze the problems faced by the parties to such lawsuits, we’ll have to discuss the U.S. Copyright Act, as well as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”).

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Your “Status Update” May be Revealing More Than Your Status

There have been a recent flurry of blog posts and media stories warning internet users about the potential dangers of posting their whereabouts on social networking sites, as such personal information is being used by opportunists to facilitate crimes. For example, just in the last month, three men in Nashua, New Hampshire allegedly used information they obtained from users’ Facebook status updates to learn when the users would not be home and thereupon broke into their vacant and vulnerable residences. Although Facebook has denied any link between its site and the crimes, the Nashua police believe that detailed information about the posters’ travel plans provided the thieves with sufficient information to know when the homes would be unoccupied.

Of course, the incidence of such crimes has not been widely disseminated through traditional media sources, such as newspapers, radio and television. As such, most Americans are unaware of this increasing phenomena. At the same time, internet users are more widely and more frequently publishing their personal information, including their travel and vacation plans, on social networking and other public sites. Moreover, beyond the routine “tweets” and run-of-the-mill social networking status updates, new applications for cellular phones and PDAs are being created to facilitate geographical updates. These applications such as “Foursquare,” “Gowalla” and “Facebook Places,” enable users to instantly identify their current physical location on the profiles they have created on social networking sites. Needless to say, allowing geographical information to freely be disclosed to the public can provide opportunists with even more accurate information about the whereabouts of their victims and their distance from an unoccupied and vulnerable residence.

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Invasions of Privacy In The Cyber Sphere: Who’s Watching And What They Know About You

Google, Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare—millions of Americans, including myself, depend on these cyber sites as their gateway to information and communication in the outside world. What we may not realize, or choose to ignore for convenience’s sake, is that this gateway lies on a two-way street. The information that we seek using websites such as Google and what we communicate on Facebook and Twitter provide companies with vital data to better market their products to us. This use of information is referred to as “data mining. “

An example of data mining can be seen in the advertisements that pop up on the side of your Facebook home page. Such ads are often relevant to the information posted on your “Profile” page, such as advertisements promoting products from your college alma mater.

At the outset, data mining seems like a win-win situation for both the consumer and the seller—the consumer is marketed with a product in which they are seemingly interested and the company has utilized its advertising budget in an informed, cost-effective manner. At the same time, however, the threat of an invasion of privacy is real and has the attention of members of Congress and federal officials to create legislation regulating the way in which, and the extent to which, our personal information is shared with third parties.

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Want to Receive Cyberinquirer by Email? Its Easy! Here’s How.

Are you a Member of the Cyberinquirer community? If so, do you receive the Cyberinquirer RSS feeds by email?

We’ve received reports from a number of Cyberinquirer Members lamenting that they do not receive the Cyberinquirer feeds and do not know when a new article is posted. If you’d like to receive these notifications, you need to sign up in the “Subscribe” box to the right of this post. Joining as a Member, while laudatory, isn’t enough if you want the feeds.

As to those of you who read our blog but haven’t signed up as a Member, well, what are you waiting for? Please join us and feel free to publish constructive substantive comments in the Members’ Forum or with respect to a particular posting. Or, even better, submit your own cyber articles for publication. The more people who get involved, the better for all of us. This is a community blog, not just mine. Let’s make good use of it! To those of you who already participate, thank you kindly and cheers.

Rick

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Concurrent CGL and E&O Coverage for “Spyware?” Yes, Says the Eighth Circuit

On July 23, 2010, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit issued an important decision in Eyeblaster, Inc. v. Federal Ins. Co., 2010, U.S. App. LEXIS 15152, No. Civ. A. 08-3640, finding concurrent coverage under both a General Liability (“CGL”) insurance policy and a separate Information and Network Technology Errors and Omissions Liability (“E&O”) policy in circumstances where an online marketing company installed software on a consumer’s computer system, allegedly corrupting the computer’s software operating system.

Eyeblaster Inc. (“Eyeblaster”), the policyholder, is a company that creates, delivers and manages online interactive advertising. For the period December 5, 2006, to December 5, 2007, it was insured under two concurrent policies issued by Federal Insurance Company (“Federal”): (1) a CGL policy covering occurrences which cause damage to tangible property, and (2) an E&O policy which covered claims for financial loss caused by a wrongful act in connection with a product’s failure to perform its intended function or serve its intended purpose, resulting in damage to intangible property. As to the latter policy, intangible property included software, data and other electronic information. Both policies were “duty to defend” forms.

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Identity Theft: Our Children At Risk

Interviewing for your first job as a teenager is as exciting as it is intimidating. Thoughts of what to do with your first paycheck consume your mind as you rehearse your best “do-you-want-fries-with-that” smile. The interview proceeds flawlessly and you start to count the dollar signs as you await the job offer. But imagine your surprise when you are informed that you did not get the job because your background check revealed that you are over $75,000 in debt and five years behind in your child support payments for your eleven year old child…a terrifying thought considering you are only 16 years old.

Adults aren’t the only victims of identity theft. Child identity theft is an increasing and understated crime. A child’s Social Security Number (“SSN”) is the perfect target, as the theft typically goes undetected until years after the crime has taken place. Indeed, the crime might not be discovered until the rightful owner/victim uses his or her SSN for the first time years later. This revelation often occurs when the victim applies for his or her first job or financial aid before college.

The scheme works as follows: businesses are using various techniques to search the Internet for dormant SSNs. These numbers often belong to long-term inmates, dead people or children. Obtaining them is not as difficult as one may think, as SSNs are distributed systematically depending on age, geographical location and when the number is issued. Once it has been determined that no one is actively using the number to obtain credit, the numbers are offered for sale.

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The White House’s “Progress” Report on Cybersecurity: There’s A Long Road Ahead

Lest one question the severity of the evolving challenges in our rapidly growing cyber world, President Obama has crystallized it succinctly: (1) “cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation;” and (2) “America’s economic prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cybersecurity.” In other words, President Obama has declared cybersecurity to be a national security priority.

While that’s obviously good news, the follow-up question is “how are we doing in meeting the associated demands?” Regrettably, not so well, it seems.

Speaking before cybersecurity and privacy experts from government, law enforcement, the private sector, academia and privacy and civil liberties groups, President Obama, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Cyber Coordinator Howard Schmidt and other Administration officials uniformly acknowledged that far more work needs to be done to protect digital communications and information infrastructure and make it more difficult and costly for cybercrimimals.

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Immigration Enforcement’s New Target: Counterfeit Movies and Shows

Apparently feeling that they’ve resolved the longstanding issue of illegal immigration and can move on to the next crisis, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) and the U.S. Justice Department have identified a new enemy in their ongoing stuggle to protect truth, justice and the American way: Internet sites that sell counterfeit goods and pirated movies.

Indeed, just this month, government officials announced that they have shut down nine websites as part of their newly announced initiative, “Operation In Our Sites,” which is intended to protect Hollywood’s intellectual property. Officials estimated that nearly 7 million pirated movies and shows per month were downloaded from the offending websites.

The announcement was held on a soundstage at The Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, CA. Neither Johnny Depp nor Captain Hook reportedly was present.

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Credit Card Hackers’ Favorite Target…Hotels.

We’ve all heard the story of the clerk at the local gas station who was double-swiping credit cards in order to make fraudulent copies. Online banking, restaurants, clothing retailers…every industry is potentially a target. Yet the industry that was the subject of more credit card thefts than any other sector in 2009? Hotels.

To the point, SpiderLabs (an affiliate of Trustwave, a data-security consulting firm) has published a study which reports that 38% of the credit card hacking events in 2009 involved the hospitality industry. Over one-third of all thefts of credit card numbers occurred at hotels. Much to my surprise, given the wealth of reporting on the subject, the financial services industry lagged well behind at a comparatively minor 19%. Retail followed at 14.2% while restaurants and bars were fourth at 13%.

I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised, though, as my own credit card number was stolen several years back while i was staying at a business travelers’ hotel in New York City. I had gone to the City for a Cinco de Mayo event sponsored by a major international insurer. Several days later, I received a call from my credit card company asking if I had bought gasoline on Long Island or a $5000 television at a big box retailer. While I do buy gasoline, I hadn’t been on Long Island. And while I certainly would have loved a $5000 television (or, for economy’s sake, something less pricey), I hadn’t bought that either. The conclusion was simple: my credit card number had been stolen when I used it at the New York hotel.

So, why hotels? According to security analysts, they’re generally easy targets. The large chain hotels may employ sophisticated security technology or other protections. Or they may not. In either case, how about smaller or private owned, non-chain hotels? The next time you check into a hotel, ask what security methods they use to protect credit card information. You probably won’t like the answer. The credit card number that you provide at check-in may sit in a folder or a file maintained right at the front desk. Who would prevent someone from simply lifting the file? Especially in the middle of the night. The single desk clerk on overnight duty?

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Cyberinquirer Nominated As One of the Top 50 Insurance Blogs for 2009

We are pleased to announce that Cyberinquirer has been nominated by LexisNexis’s Insurance Law Community Staff as one of the Top 50 Insurance Blogs for 2009. According to the LexisNexis site, “When [LexisNexis] considers a blog for membership in ILC’s annual Top 50, we look for frequent posts, timely topics, and quality writing. Only the best may gain admission. Our readers have come to expect nothing less, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.”

The comment period for nominations closes on July 9. Once the nominees have been set, LexisNexis will open a voting period of undisclosed length. Needless to say, Pamela and I are thrilled to have been considered, and we hope we continue to meet the standard described by LexisNexis’s assessment of the Top 50 Blogs. One of our important aims is to promote recognition of the enhanced exposures and liabilities inherent in a technological society and the role of cyber/tech insurance products. Again, thank you to our readers and members for your support!

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The Evolution of Cyber Risk Insurance and Why a CGL Policy is Not Enough

Richard Bortnick spoke at the recent NetDiligence Cyber Risk & Privacy Liability Forum in Philadelphia, and afterwards was asked to comment on some of the issues addressed. Here is a discussion of the evolution of the cyber risk insurance market:

Here is an interesting discussion of the definition of “publication” as used in commercial general liability policies’ “personal injury” insuring agreements.

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Two New Online Resources For IP Information: “WIPO GOLD” And USPTO

Within the last week, two separate intellectual property search engines were launched, each of which has the potential to significantly palliate searches for patents, trademarks and other IP. http://www.wipo.int/wipogold/en/

Specifically, on June 1, 2010, the World Intellectual Property Organization (“WIPO”) introduced a free online public resource, “WIPO GOLD” which aims to facilitate universal access to IP information. It promises “quick and easy access to a broad collection of searchable IP data and tools relating to, for example, technology, brands, domain names, designs, statistics, WIPO standards, IP classification systems and IP laws and treaties..” The site also includes a helpful translation option, should users wish to search results in a language other than the default, English. The news report can be viewed here: http://www.wipo.int/pressroom/en/articles/2010/article_0018.html

Meanwhile, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) separately announced on June 2, 2010 that it has entered into a “no-cost, two-year agreement with Google to make bulk electronic patent and trademark public data available to the public in bulk form.” Under the agreement, USPTO will provide Google with “existing bulk, electronic files, which Google will host without modification for the public free of charge.” Examples of searchable items include: patent grants and applications; trademark applications and Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) proceedings; and patent classification information. The USPTO and Google also will work together to make additional data available in the future, such as patent and trademark file histories and related data, the office said. The bulk data can be accessed at http://www.google.com/googlebooks/uspto.html.

In other words, as technology moves forward, so too does the ability to research and guard intellectual property ownership and interests… at least in the Western Hemisphere and other WIPO member countries. Now, if only the remainder of the world could come together to unify owners’ capabilities to globally protect their IP rights.

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Whatis Whois?

WHOIS databases often contain valuable information including the contact information for a registrant of a domain name. Although private registrations are increasingly more popular, and hide the name and location of a registrant, such private registration services nonetheless are required to provide an e-mail address for a registrant, which effectively allows the public to correspond with a registrant.

Rather than choosing to utilize a private registration service, some registrants choose instead to provide false WHOIS information in an effort to mask their true identity and to prevent consumers from contacting them. However, all accredited registrars have agreed with ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) to obtain contact information from registrants, to provide it publicly by a WHOIS service, and to take reasonable steps to investigate and correct any reported inaccuracies in contact information for domain names registered through them.

Many registrars have provided mechanisms for the reporting cases of invalid WHOIS information, which are then investigated by the registrar, and updated with valid information in appropriate cases. The registrar GoDaddy.com, for example, provides a form for reporting invalid WHOIS information at the following web address:

http://who.godaddy.com/ReportInvalidWhois.aspx?k=FV7XH2u6rpuEgY6i18fBGg==&domain=choruss.com&prog_id=godaddy

Consumers who are initially unsuccessful in submitting invalid WHOIS notifications directly to a registrar, may also try submitting such notifications through ICANN as well at the following web address:

http://wdprs.internic.net/

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Wake Up and Smell the Threats: Two Recent Examples of Why Municipalities Need Cyber Insurance

Odd as it may seem to those of us who live and breathe cyber, tech and privacy insurance, I have heard anecdotally of municipal authorities who profess that their cities and towns do not need to incur the expense of buying these products. “Why do we need them? We don’t operate on the internet,” they reportedly have said.

Well, my response is “why don’t you think you need them?” Do you maintain a bank account? Do you store personally identifiable information about private citizens, whether in your property records, police files, tax databases or otherwise? Are your employees able to access your municipality’s computer systems remotely? Is it really possible that every single piece of information you maintain is recorded on paper and nothing is stored on a mainframe, whether located on- or off-site? Come on. Its 2010. That’s virtually impossible, isn’t it? Haven’t you read my December 23, 2009 post No One is Immune. Even Government Entities Need Cyber/Tech Insurance?

Since that posting, additional municipalities have suffered cyber attacks and been the subject of cyber lawsuits.

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37 Downloads? That’ll be $27,500…How Does a Court Determine What to Charge?

This topic angers me. Fines for infringement under the Copyright Act range from $750 to $150,000 per infringement. That’s a wide spectrum! More disturbing is that the Act leaves the pricing decision in the hands of the judge, without any real guidelines for them to follow.

This week, a judge ordered Whitney Harper to pay $27,500 for illegally downloading 37 songs…I’ll do the math for you – that’s $750 a song, i.e., the minimum allowed. Earlier this year, Joel Tenenbaum was held liable for $675,000 for file sharing 30 songs – that’s $22,500 per song. It gets better. Nearly a year ago, Jammie Thomas-Rasset was ordered to pay $1.92 million by a jury for downloading 24 songs…$80,000 per download! How does the court conclude how much to, for lack of a better word, charge per song? Is it based on the popularity of the song? Does Lady Gaga or Jay-Z rank higher than Skid Row or Journey because the former are currently more mainstream?

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But I’m Innocent, I Swear! This Website Proves It!

Who would have thought a comment as innocent as “Just walked into work at Cozen O’Connor-Toronto…so much work to get done” could potentially cause you so much trouble?

I came across an article this weekend by Tracy Staedter, titled “I’m Not Home: Please Rob Me”. Ready to become paranoid? Read the article – it’s short and to the point. Ever send out Evites? How about prior tweets, MySpace posts, etc. inviting people to your place and including an address? Bingo! Better pack up and move quick!

The website causing havoc is www.PleaseRobMe.com. Check it out…make sure you aren’t on the site…then check again after every time you tweet, post, etc. Do you have the time to constantly check? Probably not. Should you? Probably. It may make you paranoid, but then again, shouldn’t you be? But should the creators of the website be blamed – legally, morally, ethically? Should they be held accountable for what you put out into the public realm? Can you sue for violation of your privacy rights? Do you really have an expectation of privacy in any of those posts? In an age where MySpace, Friendster and other social networking sites regularly have their records subpoenaed, why should anyone think that anything they post will be “private”? What piqued my curiosity even more was how this website could apply in the criminal or tort law application. Can this website be used to substantiate or corroborate an accused’s alibi – “Your Honor, look! I have proof that I wasn’t in the city when the crime occurred…I tweeted that I would be in Los Angeles!” Look, my knowledge of Canadian (or U.S., for that matter) Criminal Law/Procedure does not extend further than the 800 or so pages of textbooks I read while in law school. But surely this website can be put to more use than just what the creators intended. So long as a proper foundation is laid, and the purported evidence is relevant, it may be admitted, right? Something to definitely consider as a defense attorney.

The creators of the website claim the site is supposed to help us…to open our eyes to the evil out in the world. Call me crazy, but perhaps a simple email addressed to me would have been more appreciated…though it leaves one wondering if such a logical course of action would have been as effective.

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Does The World Need A U.N. Sponsored Cyber Peace Treaty? One Diplomat Emphatically Says Yes… As the U.S. Gears Up For A Cyberwar

As the cyber war of words heats up between the U.S. and China, the rest of the world is taking notice….and proposing action.

Most recently, the head of the United Nations’ communication and technology agency, Secretary General Hamadoun Toure of the International Telecommunications Union, proposed a treaty whereby member countries agree not to precipitate a cyber attack against other member countries. “The framework would look like a peace treaty before a war,” he is reported to have said.

Secretary Toure’s proposal follows a series of concerns expressed at last month’s World Economic Forum in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, including a harsh warning that cyber attacks could amount to a declaration of war. According to Secretary Toure, “[a] cyber war would be worse than a tsunami – a catastrophe.” Because of the potential devastating consequences of a cyber war, the Secretary strongly recommended that countries agree not to harbor cyber criminals and “commit themselves not to attack another.” Of course, nothing is quite as simple as that. For example, John Negroponte, the former director of U.S. intelligence, cautioned that intelligence agencies would “express reservations” about such a treaty. Given the breadth and scope of China’s, Russia’s and other countries’ intelligence operations and their reported limits on information disclosures, Mr. Negroponte’s remarks likely would be echoed by other nations.

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What’s in a Name? Domain Name Disputes for Dummies

Never underestimate the value of a good domain name! As any website owner will tell you, http://www.rose.com, by any other name, is likely to lose customers.

About a week ago, my colleague’s nephew, Kevin Bortnick, found himself in a domain name predicament. His plight is interesting and he has graciously permitted us to blog about his situation, which provides some useful context for a discussion about domain name disputes.

Kevin is a talented website developer who used the name “KBortnick” or “KB” for his internet business. In November of 2005, he registered the domain name kbortnick.com for a period of four years, at a cost of about $10 per year. Although the domain name expired in November, 2009, he explained that “I was moving out & had a bit of a money crunch, so I figured I’d renew it in about a month, because it really wasn’t worth anything & I figured it would be fine….”

A couple of weeks ago, he attempted to re-register the name, only to discover that someone else had purchased it. That unknown ‘someone’ had immediately put it up for sale on a website that auctions off domain names, http://seto.com, subject to a minimum bid of $480. As you can imagine, Kevin was livid. “The highest I’ve ever seen my domain name appraised at was about $30”, he exclaimed, “and most places didn’t even give it that!”

(I empathized with Kevin’s situation. Over Canadian Thanksgiving, while I was sitting before the computer in a state of turkey-induced lethargy, I was suddenly roused from my stupor by the discovery that the domain name “pamelapengelley.com” could be registered for the low, low price of just $10 a year. I may soon write a post that is entitled “How I learned the hard way that just because you can make a hideously tacky personal flash website dedicated to your glorious self doesn’t mean that you should make one.” But I digress…)

Kevin’s dilemma got me thinking – is this what is known as “cybersquatting”? Is there any remedy for this sort of thing? Does Kevin have any recourse?

In fact, there are a couple of different mechanisms for resolving a cybersquatting dispute, and my understanding of them was greatly assisted by some basic knowledge about the development of the Internet and some tech-related acronyms like “DNS”, “IP” and “ccTLD”. If these terms are unfamiliar to you, then I ask for your indulgence while I lay out some of the basic IT background. It’s a bit lengthy so if you are computer-savvy, you may just want to skip part 1. Read the rest of this entry »

Cyber/Tech Underwriters Build Their Portfolios…As Corporate Executives Fret

j0283561The risk of cyberattacks is real and growing. While many of us theorize and speak in hypotheticals about the possibility of a major and potentially devastating cyberattack (or twenty), those considered most “in the know” are taking these risks seriously. And for good reason.

A January 29, 2010 study commissioned by McAfee, Inc and authored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) reports that over one-third (37%) of the IT security executives surveyed believe that critical infrastructure such as electrical grids, oil and gas production, water supply, telecommunications and transportation networks has become increasingly vulnerable to a cyberattack. Moreover, 40% of the 600 executives from 14 countries who responded predict a major security incident in their sector within the next year. Only 20% believe their sector is secure and will successfully avoid a serious cyberattack over the next five years.

The respondents work in critical infrastructure enterprises across seven sectors in 14 countries (including the US, UK, Japan, China, Germany, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Brazil, Mexico, Australia and Saudi Arabia). Most problematic, over half of the respondents admitted that their concerns are not without foundation. Indeed, 54% acknowledged that their companies already have experienced infiltrations or large-scale cyberattacks from terrorists, organized crime gangs, and/or nation-states. The average cost of resultant downtime is estimated to be $6.3 million per day. Not chump-change by any means.

The recent cyberattack on Google is just one example. According to CSIS’s report, however, there have been scores more. With additional attacks to come. Of most concern, perhaps, over half of those surveyed believe that the U.S., China and Russia as the three most vulnerable countries.

The report, entitled “In the Crossfire: Critical Infrastructure in the Age of Cyberwar,” goes on to state that more than one-third of the executives who responded feel their respective sectors are unprepared for a major attack and that two-thirds believe the ongoing recession has caused companies to reduce resources devoted to cyber protection.

This situation harkens back to the adage “one man’s suffering is another man’s gain.” The opportunities for cyber/tech underwriters are there. Go get ‘em, ladies and gentlemen.

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The Globalization of Cyber/Tech Risks and the Implications for Worldwide Insurance Coverage

j0254490As recognized below in Pamela’s post discussing whether the loss of computer data is “property damage” in the eye of tort law, the issues surrounding cyber/tech/privacy liability and the attendant insurance coverages are not the exclusive province of the United States or U.S. courts.

To the contrary, virtually every country worldwide is increasingly faced with the problem of having to deal with the hard social and legal issues presented by a rapidly evolving cyber world. So too, policyholders and the insurers who typically grant worldwide coverage under their policies must recognize that the risks faced are not exclusive to the U.S. or our Canadian cousins. The risks are global in nature and policyholders and insurers alike need to stay current with what’s happening outside our cocoon of the Western Hemisphere.

I am certain every reader is aware of the socio-political dispute whereby Google has threatened to withdraw from China amid claims that the Chinese government has hacked into Google’s and other third-parties’ databases, spied on Google email accounts, and tightened blocks on tens of thousands of internet sites, including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has spoken on the subject, advocating that companies such as Google refuse to support “politically motivated censorship.” Secretary Clinton also accused China, Tunisia and Uzbekistan of boosting censorship and called on Beijing to investigate the recent cyber attacks on Google and others. (On a side note, just last week, Europe’s principal security and human rights watchdog accused Turkey of blocking 3700 internet sites for “arbitrary and political reasons.”).

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