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Congress Proposes Bill Protecting Student Data

While the protection of private data contained within student records is not a new concern, advances in technology and the accompanying headlines of data breach have caused Congress to reconsider the issue.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) currently protects against the unauthorized disclosure of personally identifiable information (PII) contained within student records. PII includes direct identifying information, such as a student’s name, as well as indirect identifying information, such as date or place of birth.

The role computers and networks play in the operation of schools is profound. Like many industries, the issue of data storage for schools is a significant aspect of the information technology infrastructure. Increasingly, schools (mostly public enterprises) migrate and store data in the Cloud, thus placing PII in the hands of third party (mostly private) business associates. Schools also rely on on-line text books, on-line web applications, and software as a service. Much of this did not exist when President Ford signed FERPA into law in 1974. One survey showed only 25 percent of districts notify parents that its students’ data interfaces with the Cloud.

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Tangible Property Coverage: The Next Frontier in the Tech Insurance Market

In the beginning

The emergence of the Internet as a business platform at the end of the nineties also announced the arrival of new risks to organizations. In those early days, there was a widely held belief that the primary concern was In the beginning.

The emergence of the Internet as a business platform at the end of the nineties also announced the arrival of new risks to organizations. In those early days, there was a widely held belief that the primary concern was operational, amidst concerns about the impact of a computer virus or the actions of a “Hacker”, a new term to many of us then.

Despite the lack of actuarial data, a few underwriters in the US and London started to devise solutions to indemnify business interruption losses and the costs to restore compromised data. Commonly known as “Hacker Insurance”, we found few buyers beyond large US banks. Clients found the underwriting process both intrusive and expensive as insurers demanded onsite security audits.

On July 1st 2003 everything changed.

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Cyber at Lloyds: Catching the cyber horse in motion

The following article was written by my good friend Tony Ellwood. Tony is senior executive, underwriting, at Lloyd’s Market Association and a thought leader. We are grateful to Tony for allowing us to republish his article, which first appeared in the July 16th edition of Insurance Day.

Rick

LondonThe question of whether a running horse has all four hooves in the air simultaneously was one that perplexed generations. No matter just how closely a horse was observed, the motion of its legs was simply too rapid for the human eye to register accurately. It was not until the advent of photography and an experiment by Eadweard Muybridge in 1878 that the question was answered. He developed a camera that was triggered by wires attached to a horse’s legs allowing him to shoot 24 photographs as the horse ran past, which proved beyond a shadow of doubt that a horse does indeed lose contact completely with the ground in mid-gait.

There are many parallels between Muybridge’s study of the running horse and a new survey the Lloyd’s Market Association (LMA) has launched to understand the full extent of cyber risk being underwritten in the Lloyd’s market. The similarity is the sheer pace with which cyber liability has grown from its beginnings in the mid-1990s to current global premiums in the order of £1.5bn, and still rising sharply. The speed of that growth, combined with the rate at which cyber has evolved as a product, make it a particularly tricky line to pin down. What’s more, the question that has been formulating in the LMA’s collective mind is how much cyber liability is being written at Lloyd’s within other classes of business such as marine or aviation. This survey is the first attempt to comprehensively map that business.

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Cyber Liability Insurance: The Value of an Educated Broker in the Age of E-Commerce

I first published this article in 2010. Surprisingly, its as relevant today – perhaps even more relevant – than it was four years ago.

Rick

Introduction: Insurance Products for Cyber Risks

Media reports of cyber intrusions, data thefts and computer system malfunctions involving large, high-profile companies such as Sony PlayStation, Citigroup and Lockheed’s Security Vendor, RSA, have led a rapidly growing number of companies to consider the necessity of insurance coverage for technology and cyber privacy risks. As these businesses become more reliant on electronic communication and data storage, they are also developing a heightened awareness that an unauthorized intrusion could endanger their tangible and intangible assets (including their intellectual property) and, in many cases, their reputations and abilities to conduct business. Consequently, prospective policyholders are becoming more cognizant of the necessity for insurance covering these exposures.

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The Insurance Industry and ICANN: The Next Frontier

icann-flagsWe all take the Internet for granted.  Short of a power outage taking down phone lines, cell towers and satellite transmissions, the Internet will always be there. Like death and taxes, you can count on it.

Not that the paradigm will change any time soon, but at some point, it might.

On March 14 and 17, 2014, the Wall Street Journal reported on the decision by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”), part of the Commerce Department, to cede control of the Internet from the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (“ICANN”) (a U.S. non-profit) to an organization of multinational stakeholders.

As readers of Cyberinquirer, know, ICANN is responsible for managing the core of the Internet by distributing domain names and Web addresses.  It’s been doing so since 1998.

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The Dos and Don’ts of Navigating The Cloud: A Business Guide For Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is the storage of data on remote computer servers and the sharing and transmittal of such information by way of the internet. Use of the cloud enables both businesses and casual users to maintain as much or as little electronic data as they wish on a third party’s mainframes without the need for or the expense of having to buy and maintain their own hardware systems.

The cloud’s economic benefits are clear. Still, clouds can be a legal minefield for companies and their counsel. Data breaches, hosting of illegal content and inaccessibility of critical business information are just a few examples of turbulent situations cloud users can face.

Given the risks and potential rewards of the cloud, consider the following guide before entering into a cloud provider contract:

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New York Court to Sony: No Personal Injury Coverage for You!

As many of us have been saying since the advent of cyber insurance coverage, cyber policies potentially cover privacy risks and exposures, not Commercial General Liability policies, be it under a property damage or a personal/advertising injury insuring agreement.  In other words, policyholders and their brokers would be mistaken if they deluded themselves into thinking that a standard base CGL policy’s personal injury/advertising injury coverage applies to a typical cyber breach where personally identifiable information is extracted.  Sadly, my good friend Scott Godes falls into this category.

On February 21, 2014, , Judge Jeffrey K. Oing, of the New York Supreme Court, Manhattan Commercial Division ratified this maxim by denying personal injury coverage to Sony for the 2011 breach and theft of personal information from its PS3 gaming platform, among other databases.  Zurich American Insurance Company v. Sony Corporation of America, Index No. 651982/2011 (N.Y. Supreme, filed 7/20/2011). See Complaint here.

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The Target Breach: Show Me The Insurance

The following article was first published by the Advisen Cyber Risk Network. If you haven’t checked it out, you should. Its extremely informative. And I’ll be a regular contributor.

Cheers.

Rick

By now, almost everyone has read or heard about – or even been directly impacted by – the theft of financial data relating to over 40 million credit and debit cards used at Target stores in November and December last year.

However, the insurance coverage aspects of the breach have generally flown under the radar.

To a company like Target (or whoever is affected by the next breach), the availability of insurance coverage is an important component of crisis management and remediation, litigation and regulatory investigation strategies, and reputational/brand/lost income protection.

So assuming Target has purchased potentially applicable insurance products, what coverages might apply?  And how might they respond?

At a minimum, it can be expected that Target will investigate the availability of coverage under four separate lines of insurance: Cyber, privacy and technology (CPT); general liability; crime/fidelity and; directors and officers liability policies.

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Snowden Affair Fuels the Conflict for Control of the Internet

The following article, written by my friend Vince Vitkowsky, originally appeared in Advisen Front Page News, Cyber Edition, on November 7, 2013. Vince is an attorney in private practice who specializes in litigation, arbitration, and matters at the intersection of insurance, cybersecurity, and public policy.  He can be reached at vvitkowsky@gmail.com.

Cheers.

Rick

20130711_internet10-1There is a serious conflict over future control of the Internet, as nations seek to influence its delivery mechanisms, protocols, economics, security, content, and governance.  Until now, key functions have been managed through a multi-stakeholder approach, using technical organizations such as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), with oversight conducted by the US.  But the last several years have seen a growing challenge to this system and the US role.  Now a tipping point may have been reached.  The public disclosures of the scope of the NSA surveillance programs have led to widespread international criticism, focusing and catalyzing the call for changes in Internet governance.  The Internet is the most dynamic engine for economic growth in the world today, as well as the vital mechanism for dissemination of ideas.  So the outcome of the conflict for control will have profoundly important commercial and political consequences.

Key developments.  The pressure for change came into sharp focus in Dubai in December 2012, at the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), which was held by the UN’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU).  There, the US struggled unsuccessfully against the movement for greater international control.  It urged that the current system, based around ICANN and other nongovernmental organizations, be preserved.  It made every possible effort to deny that regulation of any aspect the Internet was within the authority of the ITU.  But that view was repudiated by a majority of nations, and the WCIT ended in acrimonious collapse.

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Cyber, Privacy and Technology Best Practices and Reputational Harm: Why Legal Professionals Need a Lawyer’s Advice, Counsel and Privileges

BabyB_LPlate_improvedIntroduction

Lawyers, like other professionals, often have access to their clients’ personal and financial details. At the same time, they may possess comparable information about their clients’ clients (such as when a lawyer represents a healthcare company). As a result, lawyers are at risk for being sued if and when something happens to that information – such as when a laptop or cell phone is misplaced or stolen or a hacker breaches a law firm or client’s systems and accesses the client’s personally identifiable, health care, and/or confidential information.
The most prudent way to avoid such lawsuits and minimize their impact is to create and implement cyber, privacy and technology (“CPT”) best practices before something goes wrong. In most cases, this would include best practices training and education as well as the purchase of dedicated CPT-specific insurance. This article discusses why lawyers are at risk, how to create and implement best practices, and the advantages of CBT insurance coverage rather than (mistakenly) relying on professional errors and omissions and/or general liability coverage in the event of a CPT incident.

Executive Summary

An attorney’s reputation is his and her lifeblood. Indeed, reputation translates to the bottom line. For better or worse.
And, of course, reputation is, in large part, predicated on the quality, timeliness and cost-effectiveness of the services being provided. So too, it is incumbent that an attorney avoid negative commentary (or embarrassing revelations) through the pervasive and ubiquitous medium of social media. As a corollary, attorneys, like others, must be sensitive to the loss of customer goodwill, whether measured by turnover, client retention or other intangible assets.

Regardless of whether your clients are the Fortune 500, middle-market companies or small entrepreneurs, an attorneys’ clients – and by extension, the attorney himself and herself (to the extent the attorney holds personal, health or commercial information) – are at risk of losing personally identifiable information (“PII”), personal health information (“PHI”) and/or confidential commercial information (“CCI”). It doesn’t matter whether the harm is attributable to malicious activity or simple employee or third-party negligence. It’s the effect that is the focus, not necessarily the cause (although that too factors into the analysis).

In many cases, the effect of a cyber incident could be devastating, if not fatal, to an attorney’s reputation. And, by extension, his or her practice’s economic viability.
It is almost axiomatic to say that “best practices” are among the most important strategies employed by attorneys and other professionals. Just as we counsel clients to use best practices with respect to their operations, so too, we, as professionals, should be well-trained on the scope and extent of best practices in the subject matter presented, including, in particular, CPT risks and exposures, which, to no surprise, are palpable and potentially devastating.

In the CPT context, among others, best practices counseling should be provided by an attorney. Unlike non-lawyers, attorneys bring with them the attorney-client privilege and work product protection. Although vendors and IT specialists can promote themselves as having the appropriate knowledge and training to teach and implement best practices, they do possess the critical protections afforded by the attorney-client relationship. In a relatively new space like CPT, where the law is uncertain and developing, the privileges become even more important, as many attorneys are just at the start of the learning curve.

To continue reading, please contact me at rbortnick@cpmy.com. A complete copy will be emailed upon request. Cheers. Rick

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Asia-Pacific Cyber Law Risks and Developments

We first published the following White Paper extract in October 2011. While the White Paper might be somewhat dated (and therefore will be refreshed shortly), it remains relevant for our friends interested in learning the basics of Asia Pacific cyber/privacy law. Please let me know if you’d like to see the entire paper. Rick

I. Introduction

The Internet facilitates the widespread and instantaneous flow of information across international borders. While the advent of this method of transnational communication has truly created a “global economy,” at the same time, it has engendered problems for companies and their insurers which seek to assess risk and implement information safeguards, particularly in the face of divergent data privacy laws which vary from region to region or may not even exist in certain jurisdictions. The Asia-Pacific region typifies such a lack of uniformity.

At the same time, the emerging economies in this rapidly growing part of the world have generated promising targets for computer hackers. 75% of Asia-Pacific enterprises have experienced cyber attacks in the past 12 months. Perhaps not surprisingly, a 2010 study by Symantec reported that almost half of all Asia-Pacific-based businesses (and 67% in Singapore) ranked cyber risk and information security as their top concern—more so than natural disasters, terrorism, and traditional crime combined. Cyber attacks and data breaches are on the radar of CEOs and risk managers for good reason: the average cost for a large company to remediate a data breach in Australia increased to nearly $2 million in 2010, which is slightly up from 2009. See Ponemon Institute/Symantec 2010 Annual Study: Australian Cost of a Data Breach (May 2011).

Notwithstanding the prevalence of such attacks, it is far more likely that a cyber security program is managed as a part of a company’s traditional business risks, with traditional coverages being contorted to cover various components of cyber risk (i.e. property loss, liability to third-parties, business interruption, etc.), rather than by way of a dedicated cyber-specific insurance program. Still, in light of recent developments, it is virtually certain that companies soon will begin looking to transfer such risk via more efficient and targeted technology insurance forms and policies

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Protecting Our Children from Internet Predators, Marketers and Information Aggregators: The Need for Aggressive Government Intervention

As everyone knows, the Internet has dramatically altered (read: simplified) the way we communicate, do business and satisfy our intellectual and social curiosities. Indeed, Internet-based sales topped the trillion dollar mark for the first time in 2012 and are projected to increase 18.3% to 1.298 trillion in 2013. I’d take that rate of growth any day, particularly in the current world economy.

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Canadians More Exposed Than One Would Think

canada-flag-stereotypesOkay. Let’s start with the obvious. No, this has nothing to do with Canadian citizens and immigrants behaving badly, although that may be a topic for a future post.

What we’re talking about is the prevalence of cyber-related incidents and the resulting fallout among Canadian-based companies. And the numbers may surprise you.

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The Insurance Industry: In Regulators’ Sights

If you’re an insurance company, it may be time to open your cyber-related checkbooks if you haven’t done so already. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Department of Financial Services (“NYSDF”) soon may be watching you. They’re already asking questions as if certain insurers were “persons of interest,” just as it did earlier this year with certain of the larger banks.

On May 28, the NYSDF sent what are referred to as “308 letters” to 31 regulated health, life and general liability insurance companies (seemingly those with the highest premium revenue). The NYSDF’s letters request information on (1) the insurers’ existing IT-related management policies and procedures with respect to the prevention of cyber attacks, (2) actual cyber attacks occurring within the past three years, (3) the quantum of funds and resources dedicated to cybersecurity, and (4) how they safeguard customers’ and business entities’ health and personally identifiable information (the letters specifically identify financial information as a subject category).

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The Posts have Come Back… To Cyberinquirer


Since last we visited, your humble Publisher has moved on to the Law Offices of Richard J. Bortnick, where I am Managing Director (very European, if I do say so myself). A number of dedicated readers and friends (you know who you are) have asked what had become of me and why my old email address was no longer effective.

The answer my friend (apologies to Peter, Paul and Mary) is the Law Offices of Richard J. Bortnick. At the risk of having this viewed as attorney advertising, I will stop there other than to say I also will be signing as a free agent with a Consulting Firm to be named later (but not much later).

So, please feel free to contact me if you want to catch up, engage in intellectual banter (with the exception of Philadelphia sports, where the banter will all be negative) or have some worthwhile humor you’d like to pass along (although it can’t be as good as the material I get from my good friend Jeff). My new email address is rjbortnick@comcast.net (at least for the short term… stay tuned on that too).

Its good to be back. And thanks for all of your kind wishes.

Rick

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Cyber Liability Insurance: Ensuring Adequate Coverage in the Age of E-Commerce

I. Introduction: Insurance Products for Cyber Risks

Increasing reports of cyber intrusions, data theft and computer system malfunctions have led a rapidly-growing number of companies to purchase insurance coverage to protect themselves from technology and cyber privacy risks. Indeed, as our technology-driven economy continues to evolve and businesses become more reliant on electronic communication and data storage, they are developing a heightened awareness that an unauthorized intrusion could endanger their tangible and intangible assets (including their intellectual property) and, in many cases, their reputations and abilities to conduct business. As such, prospective policyholders are becoming more cognizant of the necessity for insurance covering such growing exposures.

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Power to the People: Social Media Technologies Mediating Corporate Social Governance

The measure of effectiveness of a CEO and its executive board has always been the degree to which the business is achieving its purpose. Whether in Canada, the U.S., Europe or Asia, an executive board’s purpose should be to increase shareholder value, a purpose that is best accomplished by serving the needs of various stakeholders. Somewhere in the pyramid of stakeholders is the consumer or client, whose likes, favorites, and preferences must be met with quality personalized products and services that deliver high competitive value. In an interconnected global knowledge economy, this has meant listening to what consumers are saying online through social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, and engaging in two-way conversations to respond in real-time to consumer demands.

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Identity Theft: A Christmas Poem Revisited

Regular Cyberinquirer readers may recall the following holiday poem by Amanda Lorenz. Like the Yule Log, we here at Cyberinquirer Central have decided to republish Amanda’s poem on an annual basis at holiday time, barring extenuating circumstances. Hope you agree that it remains fresh and timely. In any event, enjoy! And happy holiday season from your friends at Cyberinquirer.

Twas the month before Christmas and all through the house,
All the children were networking with the click of a mouse.
Cyber thieves were nestled all snug in their chairs,
Waiting for shoppers to unknowingly share.
As I shopped for him and he shopped for me,
The thieves stole our money and our financial history.
We did not even realize that this information was taken,
And we thought the denial of our credit card was mistaken.
Using Phishing or SMiShing and hacking the links,
Our private information was retrieved in a blink.
Perhaps we should have shopped on a network that was secure,
Or at least checked our credit reports monthly to be sure,
That thieves were not using our names and our faces
To purchase plane tickets to tropical places.
So to all of the shoppers who like to avoid the crowd,
Protect your info this season and make CyberInquirer proud!

Wish You a Merry Christmas cartoons image illustration picture

Happy Holidays from CyberInquirer!

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It’s Time for Professionals to Practice What They Preach

The following column appeared in the September 2012 issue of the Advisen Cyber Journal. I hope it resonates with our legal eagle subscribers. If not, then your brokers (and I) have more work to do.

Cheers.

Rick

Lawyers typically fancy themselves as the smartest people in the room. Many certainly have the largest egos in the room. But when it comes to keeping their own houses in order? Well, not so much. Its akin the shoemaker whose children go barefoot.

The same flaw appears to apply with equal force and effect with respect to accountants. And consultants. And, perhaps most incredibly, insurance brokers.

Perhaps you’ve figured out where I’m going with this. But in case you haven’t, here’s what I’m getting at. Counter-intuitive as it may seem, anecdotal reporting from a number of underwriters I’ve spoken with suggest that intelligent, thoughtful, (sometimes) rational people who bill others hundreds of dollars an hour or make sizable commissions for dispensing professional advice do not abide by their own wisdom and don’t buy cyber/technology/privacy (“CTP”) insurance.

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Planet Mars, Curiosity, and Data Security

For those captivated by recent events in astronomy, parallels can be drawn between the recent landing of NASA’s rover Curiosity on planet Mars and the public discourse on data security in Canada. With the distinction that one is effectively equipped with the right budget and tools to achieve its actual objective, both have come a very long way, both have managed to blaze through layers of clouds, both seek to secure ingredients essential to life, and both are now aimlessly wandering about unchartered territories.

A decisive factor in Barrack Obama’s 2008 political campaign was the extensive use of individual, thin sliced consumer data to send highly tailored messages to gain political support. Within 13 years, Google has become the most valuable brand in the world through the aggregation of vast amounts of data including search data, or data held in Gmail accounts. This information is then used to create an advertising cruise missile, which is much more efficient than the old method of pattern bombing.

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State Privacy Laws Evolve While Congress Campaigns

New legislation governing data breaches and privacy issues is popping up in states across the country. Most recently, Connecticut, Vermont, and Illinois have enacted new laws in these areas.

Connecticut

At long last, the proposed legislation requiring a data breach to be reported has become law in Connecticut. Section 369-701b was unable to move its way through the 2012 General Session of the Connecticut Legislature, but it was recently passed as part of the Connecticut General Assembly’s Special Session as an attachment of the Budget Bill.

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Human Error: The Greatest Risk and Root Cause of Data Security

Whether discussing data encryption, network security, or internal data privacy management practices and policies, the most sophisticated IT security protocols, the most learned team of specialists, and the most compliant of data management practices and policies cannot escape, prevent, or remedy what many businesses and organizations have rightly labeled as the root cause of data security failures: human error. While they tend to possess greater network security than smaller organizations, the risk of human error should be of particular a concern to medium and large size organizations whose internal controls over data and employees are inevitably diluted by their size and numbers.

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Data Privacy and Unauthorized Non-Hackers: the Rise and Risk of Accountability and Breach Notifications in Canada

Recent unauthorized access to British Columbia Institute of Technology’s computer network, which contained personal medical information of approximately 12,680 individuals, is yet another reminder of risks of exposure to data breaches. That none of the data on BCIT’s computer network was compromised or misused is reflective of a low-profile non-hacker intrusion, and of the ease with which computer networks can be infiltrated. Indeed, a sophisticated hacker would know better than to leave massive amounts of data, rightly labeled by some as the “oil” of the 21st century, uncompromised. More curious than uncompromised data, however, is BCIT’s notification in the absence of an actual data breach, and mandatory breach notification provisions under B.C. privacy law.

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First Circuit Court of Appeals Holds Bank’s Online Security Measures “Commercially Unreasonable” in Landmark Decision

In a landmark decision, the First Circuit Court of Appeals held in Patco Construction Company, Inc. v. People’s United Bank, No. 11-2031 (1st Cir. July 3, 2012) that People’s United Bank (d/b/a Ocean Bank) was required to reimburse its customer, PATCO Construction Co., for approximately $580,000 which had been stolen from PATCO’S bank account. In so doing, the Court reversed the decision of the United States District Court for the District of Maine which had granted summary judgment in the bank’s favor.

The dispute arose when Ocean Bank authorized six fraudulent withdrawals over seven days from an online account held by PATCO. While the bank’s security system flagged each one of the transactions as “high risk” because they were inconsistent with the timing, value, and geographic location of PATCO’s regular payment orders, the bank’s security system did not notify PATCO of this information and allowed the payments to go through. In light of this omission, PATCO sued, alleging that Ocean Bank should bear responsibility for the loss because its security system was not “commercially reasonable” under the Uniform Commercial Code, as codified under Maine Law.

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Cyberstalkers Beware: You’re Not Anonymous

A quick google search will reveal thousands of hundreds of thousands of hits for the term cyberstalking. Indeed, as of today, there are over 900,000 posts where the word is used. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of the listings involve teen cyberbullying and child protection issues. There are also large numbers of celebrities who are cyberstalked or otherwise harassed. Beyond juveniles and celebrities, the most frequently stalked demographic are 18-32 year old females, a cohort to which some of our own bloggers (and co-publishers) belong. Curiously, reports indicate that more and more women are also the cyberstalkers, not just the victims. Anecdotal stories suggest many of these women are married but unhappy with their lives.

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Past the Point of No Return: Jones v. Tsige and the “New” Tort of Invasion of Privacy in Canada

Jeremy Bentham used to refer to the common law as the “dog law”. As he explains it, “whenever your dog does anything you want to break him of, you wait till he does it, and then beat him for it. This is the way you make laws for your dog: and this is the way the judges make law for you and me.” .

Insofar as the tort of invasion of privacy in Canada is concerned, Jeremy Bentham was arguably right. Aside from the province of Quebec, which is governed by a civil law system, and a few other provinces in Canada which have benefited from a statutorily enacted tort of invasion of privacy, lower Courts have been divided over the existence of a free-standing tort of invasion of privacy at common law. The recent decision Jones v. Tsige (2012) by the Ontario Court of Appeal is the first to confirm that what used to be an embryonic tort of invasion of privacy is now alive and well in Canada

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Agreement between the US, NATO, and Australia on Cyber Security

The US and Australia have a longstanding agreement to back each other up in case of physical enemy attack, but now have moved that agreement to the arena of cyber-attack as well. With Australia’s history of cyber-attacks well known, such as an attack two years ago that brought down Australia’s Parliament’s website, the country cannot afford to ignore cyber security any longer.

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Cyber-security in a Hyperconnected World

The cyber-attacks recently launched by six individuals from the group Anonymous, an international hacktivist collective, against 13 Quebec government and police websites are but a fleeting glimpse of a much broader problem associated with the cyber world, most of which remains largely unseen. Succinctly stated, the cyber-attacks were a response to the Quebec Liberal party’s constitutionally questionable Bill 78 that was recently passed as a response to the student crisis sparked three months ago over the government’s planned 75% tuition increase. That six individual were arrested by law enforcement agencies and charged with mischief, conspiracy, and unlawful use of a computer should hardly be reassuring.

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Insurers: Assert Your Subrogation Rights

The following column was first published in the second issue of Advisen’s Cyber Liability Journal (here). I will republish my future columns in coming months. In the meantime, you can subscribe to the Journal at http://corner.advisen.com/journals.html (here).

Rick

It is axiomatic to say that insurance products evolve. Indeed, like virtually every organic structure, its development, growth and nimbleness are necessary to meet the progress of maturing, service-based economies. Hence, the advent of cyber/tech/privacy liability (CTP) insurance.

At present, there are over 25 markets selling some type of CTP coverage. Many insurers sell standalone products. Others bolt on new coverage parts to their existing products. Still others add endorsements that attempt to extend coverage to address an existing client’s business model.

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New York Court of Appeals Rules That Viewing Images On The Web Does Not Constitute Procurement, Possession or Control, Even When Cached On A Hard Drive

On May 8, 2012, the New York Court of Appeals issued a ruling that merely viewing child pornography on the internet is not a criminal act under the New York Penal Code. The People v. James D. Kent, Index 70, NYLJ 1202552838004, at *1 (Ct. of App., Decided May 8, 2012). The rationale behind the decision of the state’s highest court bears discussion on a much broader scale due to its potential bearing on the legal definitions of procurement, possession and control of digital property.

The key question under consideration was the evidentiary significance of temporary internet files (or cache files) that are automatically created and stored on a the hard drive of a computer while the user is browsing the internet. The Appellate Court concluded that the act of viewing a web image alone does not, absent other proof, constitute either possession or procurement.

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The Implications of a Cyberattack on Your Securities Portfolio: You May Want to Read Your Holdings’ 10-Ks

falling moneySo, you think that a corporate cyberattack has nothing to do with you? If so, think again. Indeed, to the extent you own stock or securities, the value of your holdings could be at risk in the event of a cyberattack. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Cybersecurity is an economic issue. See here.

Take, for example, Intel (INTC). In the “Risks” section of its 2009 10-K, the company disclosed in a tersely worded statement that its networks had been the victims of “sophisticated” attacks. Kudos to Intel for making this disclosure, which predated the October 2011 publication of the SEC Guidance addressing public companies’ cyber risks and exposures (discussed here and elsewhere, including in the March 2012 edition of the Advisen Cyber Journal. Please feel free to contact me for details on how to obtain this must-read issue and subscribe. Advisen has done a masterful job, as it does with all of its publications). As will be discussed in my next post, a significant number of public companies still have not complied with their cyber risk and cyber exposure reporting “obligations” under the SEC Guidance.

As to Intel, the subject 10-K listed several noteworthy risks. The most intriguing stated that “We may be subject to intellectual property theft or misuse, which could result in third-party claims and harm our business and results of operations.” Intel’s disclosure continued that “[w]e regularly face attempts by others to gain unauthorized access through the Internet to our information technology systems by, for example, masquerading as authorized users or surreptitious introduction of software….These attempts, which might be the result of industrial or other espionage, or actions by hackers seeking to harm the company, its products, or end users, are sometimes successful.”

The adverse economic impact of a cyber-related disclosure is not theoretical, either. Indeed, in the immediate wake of the News Corp./News of the World cell phone hacking scandal in mid-2011, News Corp’s market cap reportedly fell by over 15%, valued at approximately $7 billion, in less than a week. Not surprisingly, News Corp was sued shortly thereafter in a series of securities fraud class actions, which remain pending.

While cyber risks and exposures may or may not have an impact on a stock’s trading price, their potential impact can not be ignored. Google (GOOG) is another example. As previously discussed here, Google has been the subject of cyberattacks which it claims were precipitated by the Chinese government. The import of this development can not be understated, as it created tensions between the U.S. and Chinese governments and even made it into Intel’s SEC filing. For private citizens, however, perhaps the greatest implication of the Google cyberintrusions is the arguable effect that they had on Google’s price per share. On January 12, 2010, when the intrusion was publicly disclosed, Google shares fell 1.7% to $590.48. By April 25, 2010 Google’s shares were trading at $544.99, another roughly 8% price drop. Can these losses be directly linked to the breach of Google’s security systems? Put differently, can a possible link be dismissed? That’s for shareholders and others to decide.

So, what does this all mean? At a minimum, it suggests that the economic implications of a cyber event can be wide ranging, from the simple cost of fixing a security gap to a major hit to a brands’ reputation (remember News of the World? After 168 years of tremendous success globally, it ceased publishing on July 10, 2011 as a direct result of the hacking scandal), all the way to claims arising from the theft of consumer’s personal and financial information. Such an intrusion into the systems of retailer T.J. Maxx (TJX) lead TJX to settle with regulators, states, consumers and others and set a settlement/remediation reserve of over $100 million.

In the end, it is clear that just as consumers need to be vigilant about monitoring their personal and financial information to protect themselves from identity theft and the like, investors too must regularly track their holdings to protect their portfolios and assets. As to the companies whose information and systems are at risk, the need for both D&O and cyber insurance is patently obvious, and is as important as the protection of their intellectual property, consumer information and other non-public data. Risk management, information protection and insurance go hand in hand. And we’re here to make sure everyone recognizes the correlation.

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What Underwriters Don’t Know Can Cost Them…Dearly

j0282993The occurrence and frequency of cyber breaches are not as transparent as one might expect. Or hope, for that matter. To the contrary, the FBI’s chief cyber crimes investigator recently admitted that “thousands” of cyber crimes have gone unreported due to companies’ fears about the impact of adverse publicity on their reputations and bottom lines.

According to Shawn Henry, assistant director of the FBI’s Cyber Division, hackers regularly access computer security systems and steal millions of dollars and credit card numbers without such incidents ever being publicly reported. Indeed, Mr. Henry has acknowledged that “[o]f the thousands of cases that we’ve investigated, the public knows about a handful…There are million-dollar cases that nobody knows about.”

And the problem is not limited to Fortune 500 and other large companies such as TJX and Heartland, which have voluntarily disclosed cyber intrusions. Indeed, the incidence of cyber attacks on such companies is growing marginally or even shrinking, as these entities implement more complex security systems. The more frequent target has become medium-sized and small companies which do not have the resources or perhaps the ability or interest to enhance their cyber protections. The same goes for private citizens whose personal wealth and, equally troublesome, personal secrets may be at risk as their personally identifiable information is wrongfully retrieved and then used to access their bank and other investment accounts. Needless to say, no one wants to admit they’ve been hit or that their resources have been stolen. The stigma alone is a major deterrent to such public disclosures. (“Hey Joe… guess what… I was just robbed of $10 million!! And, they learned that I’ve been cheating on my spouse for the past ten years… How about that!!!”).

For cyber insurers, a prospective policyholder’s unwillingness to disclose such intrusions can be a major problem, both from an underwriting and claims perspective. As always, the key is proper detailed due diligence up-front. Underwriters can not take for granted that they would or should know about an intrusion at a potential account. They must ask the right questions, require the proper warranties, and “pull back the curtain” to ensure that the risks they take on are just that – risks – rather than cyber intrusions waiting to happen. “Penny-wise, pound foolish” is particularly apt. Spend the time and money to vet your proposed accounts. The cost of a claim or related coverage litigation will dwarf the expense of a thorough underwriting investigation. Unlike the availability of insurance, that is a guarantee.

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Access to Insured’s Social Media Accounts: No Friend Request Necessary

The following article, written by my colleague Nicole Moody, first appeared in the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin. Thanks to Nicole for allowing us to republish it here.

Rick Bortnick

Many of us have been there. Sipping our morning coffee, signing into our Facebook accounts, waiting to see what notifications will greet us. We are intrigued to see that we have a friend request. Who could it be? An acquaintance from the past? A new colleague who we met at work? Whoever it is, we know that by accepting the request we will be granted access into this individual’s life and will know more about them in five minutes than we would know in a lifetime of small talk.

Due to the use of usernames and passwords, there is a belief that information shared on Facebook is confidential unless publicly shared. However, courts around the country are now addressing just how private this information really is.

In cases nationwide, litigants are asking courts to grant unfettered access to other parties’ Facebook or other social media accounts. Inevitably, in the age of status updates and hashtags, poking and friending, the lines between public and private information have become blurred. This trend has become increasingly prevalent in the insurance industry as insurance companies have realized the usefulness of social media in litigation.

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The Coverage Question

We are grateful to the rapidly-growing number of Cyberinquirer readers who continue to submit substantive content for publication. This truly is an industry blog, and we strive to present alternative points of view from all quarters.

The following article was authored by Gregg A. Rapoport, Esq., and David Lam, CISSP, CPP. Attorney Rapoport has represented policyholders in coverage litigation for over 20 years as part of a broad business litigation practice based in Pasadena, California. Mr. Lam is vice president of the Los Angeles Information Systems Security Association and has over 20 years of experience as an IT and information security professional and author. This article was first published by RIMS, and we appreciate Messrs. Rapoport and Lam offering it for republication here.

Rick Bortnick

As they confront the sobering question of whether their networks and the data they carry are fully secure, today’s “C-level” executives are becoming fluent in once-esoteric information security terms. Many have reached the conclusion that no matter the size of their IT and security budgets, there is no foolproof system for securing the confidentiality, integrity and availability of their data. Company networks remain vulnerable to attacks even if they adhere to industry best practices and run best-of-breed firewalls.

To address these security challenges, companies are relying on their risk managers to evaluate the applicability of existing insurance coverage to data breach incidents, and to assess the value of transferring some of the uncovered financial risk to one of the carriers now offering cyber-risk insurance policies. As the market for these products matures, premiums have come down significantly and policy limits have increased.

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An Insurer’s View: Examining the Rising Costs of Breaches

The following article, written by reknowned London Market underwriter Rick Welsh, was first published in the November 2011 Data Guidance newsletter. A shout out to Rick for passing it on to us for republication.

Rick Bortnick

Today, no company – even with comprehensive privacy policies and practices – can be safe from data breaches. Can companies effectively transfer the risk (and cost) of data breaches by way of insurance? What costs should the companies consider? Almost every reference to the cost of data breaches or ‘cyber crime’ identifies the actual cost of the breach notification as its common currency. In Part One of this analysis, Rick Welsh, Cyber Underwriting Director at ANV, explores this metric’s limitations and the true exposure and cost of data breaches.

The well-regarded Ponemon Institute is constantly measuring the cost of a data breach and is commonly referenced by many to express the rising cost of data breaches. The second annual ‘Cost of Cyber Crime Study’ issued by the Ponemon Institute in August 2011, found that the median annualised cost of cyber crime for the 50 companies in the study was $5.9 million, with a range being between $1.5 million to $36.5 million. The annualised average was up 56% from the previous year’s study.

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New Cybersecurity Disclosure Guidance for Public Companies: Focusing Attention, Raising Questions

As regular Cyberinquirer readers know, on October 12, 2011, the SEC’s Division of Corporate Finance published “suggested” Guidance on public companies’ disclosures of their cyber risks and exposures. I published a personal perspective on the implications of the Guidance in an October 29, 2011 post (here). Since then, our friend John Doernberg of William Gallagher Associates in Boston has written an excellent, thoughtful article which adopts a more technical approach. As many of you may know, John is a Vice President at William Gallagher and focuses on privacy, information security and risk management issues. Before becoming an insurance broker in 1995, John practiced law at leading firms in New York and Boston. The following article first appeared at John’s own site, http://blog.wgains.com/?s=Doernberg, and is being republished here with his permission. Thanks John!

Rick Bortnick

Increased corporate reliance on computer networks and electronic data has brought a corresponding increase in risks associated with breaches of their security. Such breaches have become more frequent and severe. With these Guidelines, the Division has indicated that public companies and their advisors should focus greater attention on how disclosure obligations under the federal securities laws may be affected by the potential financial and operational impact of cybersecurity breaches.

The Guidelines note that cybersecurity breaches (generically referred to as cyber incidents) can be malicious (cyber-attacks) or unintentional. The Guidelines provide something of a rogue’s gallery of cyber malice: the gaining of unauthorized access to steal or corrupt sensitive data or to disrupt operations, denial of service attacks, sophisticated electronic circumvention of network security, and social engineering techniques such as phishing to extract passwords or other information that will enable the gaining of access.

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Keep Your Friends Close, But Your Facebook Posts Closer

“Facebook helps you connect and share with the people in your life.” That is the Facebook mantra, as displayed on its homepage, and the opening line of a recent – and extremely thorough! – Pennsylvania trial court decision regarding the discoverability of a plaintiff’s relevant Facebook information. The court’s conclusion: a plaintiff’s Facebook information is discoverable, provided the defendant has a good faith basis for seeking the material, because there is no confidential social networking privilege under Pennsylvania law and because the Stored Communications Act only applies to internet service providers. The take-away for Facebook users: be careful what you post – it’s not as “private” as you think!

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Cyberinquirer Named As One of LexisNexis’s Top Insurance Blogs of 2011

With the help of our readers, Cyberinquirer has again been named as one of LexisNexis’s Top Insurance blogs 0f 2011. We are obviously flattered, particularly in view of the quality of the other blogs selected to this august list. It shows that people are reading what we have to say. And that, perhaps, they are interested in what we have to say. We sure hope that to be the case. We love thinking, reading and talking about tech, privacy and cyber related issues (yeah, admittedly we’re geeks). And we hope that you, our readers, gain from our insights, even if you don’t always agree with them.

So now that we’ve been recognized by LexisNexis for the second straight period, maybe some of you, our readers, will be more comfortable authoring a piece we can post. Remember, this blog is open to all relevant, responsible submissions, be they articles, commentaries, or just comments on something we have said that strikes a chord. If you’ve got something to say that may be of interest to others in the community, email it to me at rbortnick@cozen.com and I will get back with you promptly. We strive to publish fresh, interesting content on a regular basis, but its not always easy, as we do maintain law practices. And have other commitments. So flip your authored pieces. We’d actually appreciate it.

Needless to say, we couldn’t have done this on our own. So the honor is not just for us, but for you too. Thanks.

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Would Your Company’s Insurance Cover a Cyberattack?

The following article was written by my good friend, Scott Godes, a policyholder attorney with Dickstein Shapiro in Washington, D.C., and first appeared on his personal site, Corporate Insurance Blog. Cyberinquirer neither ratifies nor necessarily agrees with the opinions stated below, which are Scott’s exclusively and not those of Cyberinquirer or Dickstein Shapiro. Responsible comment will gladly be published (promptly…). Please feel free to forward them to me at your convenience.

Rick Bortnick

On October 27, 2011, CNN.com posted:

A massive cyberattack that led to a vulnerability in RSA’s SecurID tags earlier this year also victimized Google, Facebook, Microsoft and many other big-named companies, according to a new analysis released this week.

The Krebs On Security blog posted:

Security experts have said that RSA wasn’t the only corporation victimized in the attack, and that dozens of other multinational companies were infiltrated using many of the same tools and Internet infrastructure.

This is in line with comments from others, including this quote from Digital Forensic Investigator News, that “2011 has quickly become the year of the cyber attack.” Would your insurance policies cover those events? Beyond the denial of service attacks that made news headlines, a shocking “80 percent of respondents” in a survey of “200 IT security execs” “have faced large scale denial of service attacks,” according to a ZDNet story. These attacks and threats do not appear to be on a downward trend. They continue to be in the news after cyberattacks allegedly took place against “U.S. government Web sites – including those of the White House and the State Department –” over the July 4, 2009 holiday weekend. The alleged attacks were not only against government sites; they allegedly included, “according to a cyber-security specialist who has been tracking the incidents, . . . those run by the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq, The Washington Post, Amazon.com and MarketWatch.” Themore recent ZDNet survey shows that a quarter of respondents faced denial of service attacks on a weekly or even daily basis, with cyberextortion threats being made as well.

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Securities Law and Cyber Disclosures… Perfect Together…Especially for Cyber and Tech Underwriters and Brokers. And Me

Its not often that worlds collide or that interests converge into one amorphous epiphany. But that’s exactly what happened to me recently, when the Division of Corporate Finance (DCF) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued a Disclosure Guidance identifying the types of information public companies should consider disclosing about cyber risks and events that could impact their financial statements. Now, the DCF has cautioned that the Disclosure Guidance only represents its own views and “is not a rule, regulation, or statement of the Securities and Exchange Commission.” The DCF also emphasizes right up front that “the Commission has neither approved nor disapproved its content.” Yeah, right. YOU be an officer or director or officer of a company that does not “comply” with the DCF’s “recommendations.”

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And Now, the Maine Event: Mitigation Costs Constitute Damages in Data-Breach Case

Businesses that necessarily require their customers to disclose credit card and personal information, beware. Just five days ago, the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that claims by class action plaintiffs for “mitigation damages” arising from alleged negligence and breach of contract were viable. Anderson v. Hannaford Brothers Co., Nos. 10–2384, 10–2450, 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 21239 (1st Cir. Oct. 20, 2011).

In Anderson, the electronic payment processing system of a national grocery chain, Hannaford Brothers Co., was breached by hackers in 2007. This resulted in the dissemination of as many as 4.2 million credit card and debit card numbers, expiration dates, and security codes. Hannaford Brothers was not notified of the breach until February 27, 2008 and subsequently contained the breach on March 10, 2008. A week later, Hannaford released a statement regarding the breach and announced that over 1,800 cases of fraud resulting from the theft already had been reported.

Following Hannaford’s announcement, several financial institutions immediately cancelled customers’ debit and credit cards. Some financial institutions, which refrained from immediately canceling the credit card, monitored the accounts for unusual activity, cancelling the cards, in many cases, without notifying the customer. Customers who asked that their cards be cancelled incurred fees from issuing banks for the replacement cards.

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Tenth Circuit “Dishes Out” Important Opinion Addressing The Scope Of Advertising Injury Coverage For Patent Infringement Claims

On October 17, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit issued a much-anticipated decision addressing the scope of “Advertising Injury” (“AI”) coverage for patent infringement claims. Dish Network Corp. v. Arch Specialty Ins. Co., No. 10-1445, __ F.3d __ , 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 20955 (10th Cir. 2011), rev’g, 734 F. Supp. 2d 1173 (D. Colo. 2010). The court, applying Colorado law, reversed a decision from the District of Colorado in which that court granted summary judgment to the insurers. In the underlying action, the plaintiff alleged that Dish Network Corp. (“Dish”) had infringed one or more of twenty-three patents by “making, using, offering to sell, and/or selling . . . automated telephone systems, including . . . the Dish Network customer service telephone system, that allow[s] Dish’s customers to perform pay-per-view ordering and customer service functions over the telephone.” The Tenth Circuit concluded that the record was unclear about how Dish actually used the technologies at issue, but that some of the patent-holder’s most well-known innovations involved interactive call processing.

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Facebook: Everything You Want To Know and More… Just a Discovery Request Away!

I recently attended a CLE that had a panel of social media experts who were discussing the role of Facebook, Twitter and MySpace in litigation. During a lull in the question and answer session, the Facebook attorney quipped: “you know, Facebook has already given you everything that you’ve ask for…” Immediately, the audience lifted their heads from their Blackberries and newspapers and started paying attention after this cryptic remark.

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INTRODUCTION TO CANADA’S PIPEDA PRIVACY LEGISLATION

I. Overview

Canada’s privacy regime can be described as a web of legislation at both the federal and provincial/territorial level. Some commentators express concern that this web has become tangled, lacks uniformity and actually undermines the predictability and consistency that, in their view, would exist under a single (federal) privacy regime. Canada has two primary privacy statutes: the Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (“PIPEDA”). The Privacy Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. P-21 (Can.), took effect on July 1, 1983, and imposed certain privacy rights obligations on approximately 250 federal government departments and agencies by limiting the use and disclosure of personal information. The Privacy Act also gives individuals the right to access and, if necessary, correct personal information held by governmental organizations subject to the Act.

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Underwriters and Their Policyholders Agree: Less Is More When It Comes to Crisis Management Expenses

Doug Pollack of IDExperts recently published a blog post on cyber insurance that caught my eye. Insofar as IDExperts is a respected provider of cyber breach response services, I assumed the article would address technical issues. Upon reading the piece, however, I was disappointed to find that the article addressed insurance-related matters, including criteria for the selection of insurance products and programs, a topic typically the province of risk managers, brokers, underwriters and lawyers. Hmmm…

At the outset, the article addresses technical issues, as the author correctly suggests that “privacy, compliance and legal officers should work closely with their risk manager to ensure that the organization is getting a policy that meets its needs.” Having hooked me with that truism, I was looking forward to reading on. But that is where the technical commentary (and our common perspective) ends. From there, the author moves on to express his views (and, in my counter-view, misconceptions) on cyber insurance products and how they should operate.

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Ensuring Discovery Compliance: Sanctions Relating to Past, Present, and Future Adverse Parties

First published on September 22, 2011 at e-Discovery Law Review
Monetary sanctions, attorneys fees, and adverse inference jury instructions are the more common type of sanctions imposed on litigants for the spoliation of evidence, or not producing relevant documents. Recently, however, a court has increased the severity and impact of sanctions by applying them not only to current litigation, but also to a party’s future litigation, with the effects lingering for years to come.

The Underlying Suit

“Any competent electronic discovery effort would have located this email.” These words were written in an opinion by a United States District Judge in the Eastern District of Texas in Green v. Blitz U.S.A., Inc., No. 2:07-CV-372 (E.D. Tex., Mar. 1, 2011) Green involved a product liability suit in which the requirement of a flame arrester was in dispute. The jury returned a defense verdict, and the plaintiff collected a low settlement amount as part of a high-low settlement agreement. During discovery in a subsequent case with the same defendant and plaintiff’s counsel, counsel learned of documents that were not produced in Green. The plaintiff then filed a motion for sanctions against the defendant in Green and a motion to re-open the Green case. While the court denied the motion to re-open because the statute of limitations had expired, the court did impose sanctions for the discovery abuse.

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For Some Universities, Cyber Insurance Doesn’t Make The Grade

Data security breaches pose a serious threat to a corporation’s financial stability as well as to its credibility in the marketplace. Most notably, the 2007 TJX data security breach, where 45 million credit card and debit card numbers were stolen, cost the company over $4 billion. For many corporations, the solution is to purchase a cyber liability insurance policy, which provides insurance coverage in the event of such a breach.

The risk of data security breaches has also affected students of universities throughout the nation. In June of last year, Cornell University officials informed 45,000 members of the school’s community that their personal information, including their names and social security numbers, was stolen after a University-owned laptop was stolen. Due to such breaches, college officials nationwide have begun purchasing cyber liability insurance policies to offset the financial burdens of a data security breach.

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Best Buy “Geeks” Out, Accusing Others of Trademark Infringement

In addition to being a trademark geek, I could be accurately accused of also being a tech geek. A “geek” is someone who loves using, and helping other people use, technology to help simplify his or her life. Best Buy, capitalizing on this endearing term for electronic lovers, created the Geek Squad, a tech support service. Their distinctive orange and black cars marked with their trademarked logo can be called out to provide in-home support or they are just a phone call away to help you with your technological needs.

There’s not too many other words other than geek that convey the nerdy type of people who love technology, but Best Buy is taking action against others who use “geek” for this purpose in their slogans. In a recent lawsuit against Newegg.com, Best Buy claimed trademark infringement over Newegg’s slogan “Geek On,” saying that the similarity between the motto, in addition to using orange and black in their logo, breaches their rights. And this is neither the first, nor the last, time that Best Buy will sue companies over this issue.

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What is Corporate and Business Identity Theft and What Are the Risks and Damages Associated with It?

The yellow fever outbreak of summer 1798 was the worst in Philadelphia’s history. Over 5,000 residents were infected, and nearly 1,300 died, causing even President Washington to flee. On the night of September 1st, 1798, the vault at Carpenter Hall was breached and the then-massive amount of $162,821 went missing. This first bank robbery in the United States, attributed as an “inside job”, ushered in an era of robberies that turned criminals into celebrities. Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, and John Dillinger have become legends. At present, the risk of yellow fever has been mitigated due to vaccines. The risk of bank vaults being physically robbed similarly has been reduced.

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Discovery in the Age of Cloud Computing

During the last decade, individuals and business have changed the way they manage their data by moving this data management offsite – otherwise known as cloud computing. This differs from the old model of information management that, more or less, mirrored the pre-computing era, meaning that an employee’s file might be kept in a cabinet in a Human Resources (“HR”) office or stored on a company’s in-house server. With cloud computing, however, that same employee file may be stored hundreds or thousands of miles away from the HR officer who needs to review it – or the IT officer tasked with preserving that data for potential litigation.

As discussed more fully in Rick Bortnick’s prior posts (here and here), cloud computing outsources data and software management, migrating it from the local to the global by providing instant access over the internet. According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing has five primary characteristics: (1) “on-demand self-service,” or the ability to call up stored data or capabilities as needed; (2) broad network access through a variety of platforms; (3) pooling resources providing “location independence”; (4) “rapid elasticity” in the distribution of computing capabilities, and (5) “measured service,” or service-appropriate control and optimization by the cloud system manager rather than the local user. It is the pooling of resources and the measured service managed by third-parties that pose the greatest risks during e-discovery.
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