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The Target Breach: Show Me The Insurance

The following article was first published by the Advisen Cyber Risk Network. If you haven’t checked it out, you should. Its extremely informative. And I’ll be a regular contributor.

Cheers.

Rick

By now, almost everyone has read or heard about – or even been directly impacted by – the theft of financial data relating to over 40 million credit and debit cards used at Target stores in November and December last year.

However, the insurance coverage aspects of the breach have generally flown under the radar.

To a company like Target (or whoever is affected by the next breach), the availability of insurance coverage is an important component of crisis management and remediation, litigation and regulatory investigation strategies, and reputational/brand/lost income protection.

So assuming Target has purchased potentially applicable insurance products, what coverages might apply?  And how might they respond?

At a minimum, it can be expected that Target will investigate the availability of coverage under four separate lines of insurance: Cyber, privacy and technology (CPT); general liability; crime/fidelity and; directors and officers liability policies.

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Asia-Pacific Cyber Law Risks and Developments

We first published the following White Paper extract in October 2011. While the White Paper might be somewhat dated (and therefore will be refreshed shortly), it remains relevant for our friends interested in learning the basics of Asia Pacific cyber/privacy law. Please let me know if you’d like to see the entire paper. Rick

I. Introduction

The Internet facilitates the widespread and instantaneous flow of information across international borders. While the advent of this method of transnational communication has truly created a “global economy,” at the same time, it has engendered problems for companies and their insurers which seek to assess risk and implement information safeguards, particularly in the face of divergent data privacy laws which vary from region to region or may not even exist in certain jurisdictions. The Asia-Pacific region typifies such a lack of uniformity.

At the same time, the emerging economies in this rapidly growing part of the world have generated promising targets for computer hackers. 75% of Asia-Pacific enterprises have experienced cyber attacks in the past 12 months. Perhaps not surprisingly, a 2010 study by Symantec reported that almost half of all Asia-Pacific-based businesses (and 67% in Singapore) ranked cyber risk and information security as their top concern—more so than natural disasters, terrorism, and traditional crime combined. Cyber attacks and data breaches are on the radar of CEOs and risk managers for good reason: the average cost for a large company to remediate a data breach in Australia increased to nearly $2 million in 2010, which is slightly up from 2009. See Ponemon Institute/Symantec 2010 Annual Study: Australian Cost of a Data Breach (May 2011).

Notwithstanding the prevalence of such attacks, it is far more likely that a cyber security program is managed as a part of a company’s traditional business risks, with traditional coverages being contorted to cover various components of cyber risk (i.e. property loss, liability to third-parties, business interruption, etc.), rather than by way of a dedicated cyber-specific insurance program. Still, in light of recent developments, it is virtually certain that companies soon will begin looking to transfer such risk via more efficient and targeted technology insurance forms and policies

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Cyber Liability Insurance: The Value of an Educated Broker in the Age of E-Commerce

Introduction: Insurance Products for Cyber Risks

Media reports of cyber intrusions, data thefts and computer system malfunctions involving large, high-profile companies such as Sony PlayStation, Citigroup and Lockheed’s Security Vendor, RSA, have led a rapidly growing number of companies to consider the necessity of insurance coverage for technology and cyber privacy risks. As these businesses become more reliant on electronic communication and data storage, they are also developing a heightened awareness that an unauthorized intrusion could endanger their tangible and intangible assets (including their intellectual property) and, in many cases, their reputations and abilities to conduct business. Consequently, prospective policyholders are becoming more cognizant of the necessity for insurance covering these exposures.

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State Privacy Laws Evolve While Congress Campaigns

New legislation governing data breaches and privacy issues is popping up in states across the country. Most recently, Connecticut, Vermont, and Illinois have enacted new laws in these areas.

Connecticut

At long last, the proposed legislation requiring a data breach to be reported has become law in Connecticut. Section 369-701b was unable to move its way through the 2012 General Session of the Connecticut Legislature, but it was recently passed as part of the Connecticut General Assembly’s Special Session as an attachment of the Budget Bill.

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Insurers: Assert Your Subrogation Rights

The following column was first published in the second issue of Advisen’s Cyber Liability Journal (here). I will republish my future columns in coming months. In the meantime, you can subscribe to the Journal at http://corner.advisen.com/journals.html (here).

Rick

It is axiomatic to say that insurance products evolve. Indeed, like virtually every organic structure, its development, growth and nimbleness are necessary to meet the progress of maturing, service-based economies. Hence, the advent of cyber/tech/privacy liability (CTP) insurance.

At present, there are over 25 markets selling some type of CTP coverage. Many insurers sell standalone products. Others bolt on new coverage parts to their existing products. Still others add endorsements that attempt to extend coverage to address an existing client’s business model.

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WARNING: HHS Now Combating HIPAA Violations With HITECH Weaponry

On March 13, 2012 – almost 30 months after becoming one of the first entities to self-report a breach under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act – BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee (BCBST) agreed to pay the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) a record setting $1.5 million civil monetary penalty (CMP) for failing to safeguard protected health information (PHI).


The HITECH Act and HIPAA Enforcement

HHS adopted the interim final rule for HITECH’s breach notification requirement only a few weeks before the BCBST breach. The final rule requires covered entities to notify HHS following a breach of unsecured PHI. If a breach affects 500 or more individuals, the covered entity must report the breach electronically “without reasonable delay and in no case later than 60 days from discovery of the breach.”

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The Coverage Question

We are grateful to the rapidly-growing number of Cyberinquirer readers who continue to submit substantive content for publication. This truly is an industry blog, and we strive to present alternative points of view from all quarters.

The following article was authored by Gregg A. Rapoport, Esq., and David Lam, CISSP, CPP. Attorney Rapoport has represented policyholders in coverage litigation for over 20 years as part of a broad business litigation practice based in Pasadena, California. Mr. Lam is vice president of the Los Angeles Information Systems Security Association and has over 20 years of experience as an IT and information security professional and author. This article was first published by RIMS, and we appreciate Messrs. Rapoport and Lam offering it for republication here.

Rick Bortnick

As they confront the sobering question of whether their networks and the data they carry are fully secure, today’s “C-level” executives are becoming fluent in once-esoteric information security terms. Many have reached the conclusion that no matter the size of their IT and security budgets, there is no foolproof system for securing the confidentiality, integrity and availability of their data. Company networks remain vulnerable to attacks even if they adhere to industry best practices and run best-of-breed firewalls.

To address these security challenges, companies are relying on their risk managers to evaluate the applicability of existing insurance coverage to data breach incidents, and to assess the value of transferring some of the uncovered financial risk to one of the carriers now offering cyber-risk insurance policies. As the market for these products matures, premiums have come down significantly and policy limits have increased.

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An Insurer’s View: Examining the Rising Costs of Breaches

The following article, written by reknowned London Market underwriter Rick Welsh, was first published in the November 2011 Data Guidance newsletter. A shout out to Rick for passing it on to us for republication.

Rick Bortnick

Today, no company – even with comprehensive privacy policies and practices – can be safe from data breaches. Can companies effectively transfer the risk (and cost) of data breaches by way of insurance? What costs should the companies consider? Almost every reference to the cost of data breaches or ‘cyber crime’ identifies the actual cost of the breach notification as its common currency. In Part One of this analysis, Rick Welsh, Cyber Underwriting Director at ANV, explores this metric’s limitations and the true exposure and cost of data breaches.

The well-regarded Ponemon Institute is constantly measuring the cost of a data breach and is commonly referenced by many to express the rising cost of data breaches. The second annual ‘Cost of Cyber Crime Study’ issued by the Ponemon Institute in August 2011, found that the median annualised cost of cyber crime for the 50 companies in the study was $5.9 million, with a range being between $1.5 million to $36.5 million. The annualised average was up 56% from the previous year’s study.

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Insurance Recovery for Loss or Liability Arising from Cyberattacks: Obtain and Preserve Insurance for Your Company’s Protection

The following article was written by my good friend, Scott Godes, a policyholder attorney with Dickstein Shapiro in Washington, D.C., and his colleague, Ken Trotter, and appeared on Scott’s personal site, Corporate Insurance Blog, after being published by Hospitality Upgrade magazine. Cyberinquirer neither ratifies nor necessarily agrees with the opinions stated below, which are Scott’s exclusively and not those of Cyberinquirer or Dickstein Shapiro.

Rick Bortnick

It is no secret that the hospitality industry continues to be vulnerable to data breaches and other cyberattacks. A report by Willis Group Holdings, a British insurance firm, states that the largest share of cyberattacks (38 percent) were aimed at hotels, resorts and tour companies. According to the report, insurance claims for data theft worldwide jumped 56 percent last year, with a bigger number of those attacks targeting the hospitality industry. Because businesses in the hospitality industry obtain and maintain confidential data from consumers–countless credit card records in particular–they will continue to be attractive targets for hackers and data thieves. Cybersecurity risks can cause a company to incur significant loss or liability. A data breach could result in the loss of important and sensitive customer information and, in some cyberevents, stolen company funds. Companies also may face liabilities to third parties under statutory and regulatory schemes, incurring costs to mitigate, remediate and comply with the liability under these statutes. Worse still, class action lawsuits have been filed around the country after data breaches, with plaintiffs alleging, among others, the loss of the value of their personal information, identity theft, invasion of privacy, negligence or contractual liability. Even when companies have had success in defeating class actions, they nonetheless incurred significant legal expenses when defending those lawsuits.

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INTRODUCTION TO CANADA’S PIPEDA PRIVACY LEGISLATION

I. Overview

Canada’s privacy regime can be described as a web of legislation at both the federal and provincial/territorial level. Some commentators express concern that this web has become tangled, lacks uniformity and actually undermines the predictability and consistency that, in their view, would exist under a single (federal) privacy regime. Canada has two primary privacy statutes: the Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (“PIPEDA”). The Privacy Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. P-21 (Can.), took effect on July 1, 1983, and imposed certain privacy rights obligations on approximately 250 federal government departments and agencies by limiting the use and disclosure of personal information. The Privacy Act also gives individuals the right to access and, if necessary, correct personal information held by governmental organizations subject to the Act.

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Underwriters and Their Policyholders Agree: Less Is More When It Comes to Crisis Management Expenses

Doug Pollack of IDExperts recently published a blog post on cyber insurance that caught my eye. Insofar as IDExperts is a respected provider of cyber breach response services, I assumed the article would address technical issues. Upon reading the piece, however, I was disappointed to find that the article addressed insurance-related matters, including criteria for the selection of insurance products and programs, a topic typically the province of risk managers, brokers, underwriters and lawyers. Hmmm…

At the outset, the article addresses technical issues, as the author correctly suggests that “privacy, compliance and legal officers should work closely with their risk manager to ensure that the organization is getting a policy that meets its needs.” Having hooked me with that truism, I was looking forward to reading on. But that is where the technical commentary (and our common perspective) ends. From there, the author moves on to express his views (and, in my counter-view, misconceptions) on cyber insurance products and how they should operate.

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What is Corporate and Business Identity Theft and What Are the Risks and Damages Associated with It?

The yellow fever outbreak of summer 1798 was the worst in Philadelphia’s history. Over 5,000 residents were infected, and nearly 1,300 died, causing even President Washington to flee. On the night of September 1st, 1798, the vault at Carpenter Hall was breached and the then-massive amount of $162,821 went missing. This first bank robbery in the United States, attributed as an “inside job”, ushered in an era of robberies that turned criminals into celebrities. Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, and John Dillinger have become legends. At present, the risk of yellow fever has been mitigated due to vaccines. The risk of bank vaults being physically robbed similarly has been reduced.

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Cyber Liability Insurance for Universities: Incentivizing Best Practices as a Condition to Coverage (a.k.a “Reverse Underwriting”)

Computer hacking is a constantly evolving and growing threat. While recent high-profile network security breaches at companies such as Epsilon and Sony (with crisis management and other costs estimated to range from $1 billion to multiples thereof in the case of Sony) have helped raise awareness about the need to adequately protect personal identifiable information, the problem has existed for decades.

Yet the situation has only recently begun to receive proper attention from the media, government officials, businesses, and certain segments of the insurance industry. Of course, the cost of a security breach may have something to do with that. According to a study from Marsh and the Ponemon Institute, the typical data breach in FY 2010 resulted in companies and their insurers have to pay an average of $7.2 million to deal with and remedy the situation.

One particularly alluring target for hackers has been educational institutions. While schools and universities may not immediately appear to be obvious targets, the statistics confirm that attacks against educational institutions are on the rise.

In 2007, educational institutions accounted for 25% of all reported data breaches. This number jumped to 33% in 2008. See Sarah Stephens & Shannan Fort, Cyber Liability & Higher Education, Aon Professional Risk Solutions White Paper (December 2008) Read the rest of this entry »

Credit Monitoring vs. Identity Monitoring

Today, data breaches are a frequent occurrence. Often with the disclosure of each breach comes an announcement of credit report monitoring for affected individuals for a certain time period. So what does credit monitoring really provide? Identity protection, peace of mind or simply customer goodwill?

Credit report monitoring is the checking of one’s credit history in order to detect suspicious activity or changes. Companies that provide credit monitoring typically will alert the individual to activity tied to his or her social security number, such as credit inquiries, delinquencies, negative information, employment changes and new accounts. So why does credit monitoring fail to provide identity theft protection?

1. First, individuals can receive a free credit report on an annual basis. The three credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, have set up the following internet website, through which individuals can request free copies of their annual credit reports: https://www.annualcreditreport.com/cra/index.jsp.

2. Secondly, criminals will wait at least one year and one day in the brokering or use of stolen data if the company that sustained the privacy breach offers one year credit monitoring.

3. Third, credit monitoring primarily serves to alert, after the fact, the opening of new accounts. In turn, it typically does not warn the individual of changes with their existing credit. Hence, to the extent the persons’ current credit ratings have been adversely affected by the malicious acts of a third-party, they may go unreported and be unknown to the person whose credit has been impacted.

4. Fourth and most importantly, credit monitoring fails to protect against the malevolent conduct listed below, as outlined by the non-profit Identity Theft Resource Center:

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