Ping Service
Feedback Forms

Asia-Pacific Cyber Law Risks and Developments

We first published the following White Paper extract in October 2011. While the White Paper might be somewhat dated (and therefore will be refreshed shortly), it remains relevant for our friends interested in learning the basics of Asia Pacific cyber/privacy law. Please let me know if you’d like to see the entire paper. Rick

I. Introduction

The Internet facilitates the widespread and instantaneous flow of information across international borders. While the advent of this method of transnational communication has truly created a “global economy,” at the same time, it has engendered problems for companies and their insurers which seek to assess risk and implement information safeguards, particularly in the face of divergent data privacy laws which vary from region to region or may not even exist in certain jurisdictions. The Asia-Pacific region typifies such a lack of uniformity.

At the same time, the emerging economies in this rapidly growing part of the world have generated promising targets for computer hackers. 75% of Asia-Pacific enterprises have experienced cyber attacks in the past 12 months. Perhaps not surprisingly, a 2010 study by Symantec reported that almost half of all Asia-Pacific-based businesses (and 67% in Singapore) ranked cyber risk and information security as their top concern—more so than natural disasters, terrorism, and traditional crime combined. Cyber attacks and data breaches are on the radar of CEOs and risk managers for good reason: the average cost for a large company to remediate a data breach in Australia increased to nearly $2 million in 2010, which is slightly up from 2009. See Ponemon Institute/Symantec 2010 Annual Study: Australian Cost of a Data Breach (May 2011).

Notwithstanding the prevalence of such attacks, it is far more likely that a cyber security program is managed as a part of a company’s traditional business risks, with traditional coverages being contorted to cover various components of cyber risk (i.e. property loss, liability to third-parties, business interruption, etc.), rather than by way of a dedicated cyber-specific insurance program. Still, in light of recent developments, it is virtually certain that companies soon will begin looking to transfer such risk via more efficient and targeted technology insurance forms and policies

Read the rest of this entry »

Cyber Liability Insurance: The Value of an Educated Broker in the Age of E-Commerce

Introduction: Insurance Products for Cyber Risks

Media reports of cyber intrusions, data thefts and computer system malfunctions involving large, high-profile companies such as Sony PlayStation, Citigroup and Lockheed’s Security Vendor, RSA, have led a rapidly growing number of companies to consider the necessity of insurance coverage for technology and cyber privacy risks. As these businesses become more reliant on electronic communication and data storage, they are also developing a heightened awareness that an unauthorized intrusion could endanger their tangible and intangible assets (including their intellectual property) and, in many cases, their reputations and abilities to conduct business. Consequently, prospective policyholders are becoming more cognizant of the necessity for insurance covering these exposures.

Read the rest of this entry »

Protecting Our Children from Internet Predators, Marketers and Information Aggregators: The Need for Aggressive Government Intervention

As everyone knows, the Internet has dramatically altered (read: simplified) the way we communicate, do business and satisfy our intellectual and social curiosities. Indeed, Internet-based sales topped the trillion dollar mark for the first time in 2012 and are projected to increase 18.3% to 1.298 trillion in 2013. I’d take that rate of growth any day, particularly in the current world economy.

Read the rest of this entry »

Canadians More Exposed Than One Would Think

canada-flag-stereotypesOkay. Let’s start with the obvious. No, this has nothing to do with Canadian citizens and immigrants behaving badly, although that may be a topic for a future post.

What we’re talking about is the prevalence of cyber-related incidents and the resulting fallout among Canadian-based companies. And the numbers may surprise you.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Insurance Industry: In Regulators’ Sights

If you’re an insurance company, it may be time to open your cyber-related checkbooks if you haven’t done so already. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Department of Financial Services (“NYSDF”) soon may be watching you. They’re already asking questions as if certain insurers were “persons of interest,” just as it did earlier this year with certain of the larger banks.

On May 28, the NYSDF sent what are referred to as “308 letters” to 31 regulated health, life and general liability insurance companies (seemingly those with the highest premium revenue). The NYSDF’s letters request information on (1) the insurers’ existing IT-related management policies and procedures with respect to the prevention of cyber attacks, (2) actual cyber attacks occurring within the past three years, (3) the quantum of funds and resources dedicated to cybersecurity, and (4) how they safeguard customers’ and business entities’ health and personally identifiable information (the letters specifically identify financial information as a subject category).

Read the rest of this entry »