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Best Buy “Geeks” Out, Accusing Others of Trademark Infringement

In addition to being a trademark geek, I could be accurately accused of also being a tech geek. A “geek” is someone who loves using, and helping other people use, technology to help simplify his or her life. Best Buy, capitalizing on this endearing term for electronic lovers, created the Geek Squad, a tech support service. Their distinctive orange and black cars marked with their trademarked logo can be called out to provide in-home support or they are just a phone call away to help you with your technological needs.

There’s not too many other words other than geek that convey the nerdy type of people who love technology, but Best Buy is taking action against others who use “geek” for this purpose in their slogans. In a recent lawsuit against Newegg.com, Best Buy claimed trademark infringement over Newegg’s slogan “Geek On,” saying that the similarity between the motto, in addition to using orange and black in their logo, breaches their rights. And this is neither the first, nor the last, time that Best Buy will sue companies over this issue.

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What is Corporate and Business Identity Theft and What Are the Risks and Damages Associated with It?

The yellow fever outbreak of summer 1798 was the worst in Philadelphia’s history. Over 5,000 residents were infected, and nearly 1,300 died, causing even President Washington to flee. On the night of September 1st, 1798, the vault at Carpenter Hall was breached and the then-massive amount of $162,821 went missing. This first bank robbery in the United States, attributed as an “inside job”, ushered in an era of robberies that turned criminals into celebrities. Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, and John Dillinger have become legends. At present, the risk of yellow fever has been mitigated due to vaccines. The risk of bank vaults being physically robbed similarly has been reduced.

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Discovery in the Age of Cloud Computing

During the last decade, individuals and business have changed the way they manage their data by moving this data management offsite – otherwise known as cloud computing. This differs from the old model of information management that, more or less, mirrored the pre-computing era, meaning that an employee’s file might be kept in a cabinet in a Human Resources (“HR”) office or stored on a company’s in-house server. With cloud computing, however, that same employee file may be stored hundreds or thousands of miles away from the HR officer who needs to review it – or the IT officer tasked with preserving that data for potential litigation.

As discussed more fully in Rick Bortnick’s prior posts (here and here), cloud computing outsources data and software management, migrating it from the local to the global by providing instant access over the internet. According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing has five primary characteristics: (1) “on-demand self-service,” or the ability to call up stored data or capabilities as needed; (2) broad network access through a variety of platforms; (3) pooling resources providing “location independence”; (4) “rapid elasticity” in the distribution of computing capabilities, and (5) “measured service,” or service-appropriate control and optimization by the cloud system manager rather than the local user. It is the pooling of resources and the measured service managed by third-parties that pose the greatest risks during e-discovery.
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